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2013 Vancouver 100

1 June 2013 - Starter Photo in Deep Cove

2013 Vancouver 100 Run Report

I’m glad to say that the 2013 Vancouver 100 was a unique experience for me and that it seems as though all the runners and supporters had their own positive and unique experiences too. A little history: in 1999 I ran my first marathon (Vancouver) and first ultra (Knee Knacker) and in 2002 I attempted my first double crossing of the Baden Powell Centennial Trail along with my running friend Deb Schmidt pacing me for the first 50 km from Deep Cove to Horseshoe Bay. We started at 6:00 p.m. that day and made it to the start of the Knee Knacker race at 6:00 a.m. with minutes to spare. I bonked 45 minutes after that Knee Knacker start and after help from the race sweeps I eventually got a ride home from Tim Jones (North Shore Rescue) upon his insistence – thanks again Tim. In 2005 we held the first 96 km “The Double” and since 2006 it’s been called the 100 km “Vancouver 100”. From the first running of The Double I have been told by numerous and widely experienced ultra-runners that our mountainous course is one of the most difficult of the big trail runs in North America. I’ve done some statistical checking of my own to support that claim and it’s easy to agree. So far I’ve only found one event that even comes close and that’s the 100 km version of H.U.R.T. 100 in Hawaii (not really even North America). All others at the 100 km distance apparently pale in comparison.

Thankfully I’ve completed the V100 a few times before and I promised myself this time would be for a new experience. I decided that going for the triple (V150) would be the difference, especially since there was no known record of that being done. And I figured that if I actually made the triple there wasn’t much anyone could do to stop me from making that final 10 km or so journey to make it a full 160km (100 miles). It was a lofty but worthy goal for me since I had not yet completed a run of that distance. The plan gradually came together and I heard from Deb that she was interested in pacing me again so at least on paper we were good to go.

(Photo of Craig flagging by Andrew Wong)

On Friday, May 31, we set out from Nelson Canyon at 3:00 p.m. to be sure to finish the first 50 km before the proper event start at 5:00 a.m. Saturday morning. The weather was perfect, mostly clear and cool enough, with seasonal temps around 18C. I had spent several outings on the entire course determining conditions and adding some marking on the toughest spots to be sure we didn’t waste any time. Lots of blow downs were cleared on the Hollyburn Chute in the preceding weeks by me and some of our Knee Knacker friends due to some very severe winds this Spring. I counted 60 trees down on the Chute alone but that was the worst hit area.

Our run on Friday night and Saturday morning was essentially uneventful. The pace was as expected, 5:07 for 25 km to Cleveland Dam then 6.5 hours to Deep Cove through the night: my 100 mile pace I imagined. That was about 8,300 feet up and 8,000 feet down so far. I was Tweeting along the way @lostinthetrees to #Vancouver100 and was not expecting nor did we plan for any assistance. We heard the coolest owl hooting on Grouse Mountain but didn’t see any wildlife of note. Snow at the higher elevations was continuing to melt quickly and lots of bare ground was showing on Black and Hollyburn Mountains, even compared to the week before. The trail was very quiet, especially in Deep Cove from Quarry Rock to the Cove. In fact, it was absolutely deserted of the hundreds of people we normally see there if you can imagine. Mind you that was smack dab in the middle of the night. The only significant stop we made was at Cleveland Dam to refill on water and at Mountain Highway for an impromptu Kraft Dinner meal provided by my generous neighbours (Brendan, Roz, Misha and Robbie) who came up from our home in Lynn Valley.

Deb and I have probably each run sections of the BP Trail between Grouse and Deep Cove hundreds of times over the years. My first Knee Knacker was in 1999 – Year of the Snow. Deb lives in North Vancouver so it’s home ground to her as well. All of this made it an easy trek to the Cove by my estimated call of 2:30 a.m. In fact I arrived at the fire hydrant after running down the road to the black gate and back at exactly 2:30. Eleven and half hours for 50 km. Not fast. Not intended to be fast. Right on time in my books. I ate, drank, sat for a few minutes, Tweeted, sorted out lights and food and was heading back down the road by 3:08 a.m. Deb headed home and insisted I call her if there were any issues. The advance plan was to have fellow Team Dodgy cohort, Dave Berg with the help of his incredible crew of wife Helen, do the event briefing at 5:00 a.m. for the V100 starters. That all worked out and I knew that the first runner would be catching up to me around Lynn Canyon.

It got significantly light around 5:00 a.m. and that’s about the time I took my headlamp off. The Seymour Grind is very peaceful normally but was extra quiet at that time of day. I was very much enjoying my time on the trail. Not long after, I entered Lynn Canyon and sat down on a bench for a short break to refuel. I thought that Sammy the superhuman ultra-runner might be passing me soon and at 6:22 a.m., barely 30 seconds after I sat down, he appeared down the trail. We chatted and off he went flying up the long set of stairs toward the Suspension Bridge. It would be another 40 minutes before the next runner would find me. It was Dave Berg looking good at Lynn Headwaters just past the Varley Trail immediately followed by two more. I wish I had their speed. Of course part of my unique experience plan was to be out there to see the runners as they caught me.

More and more runners eventually passed me as I closed in on Grouse Mountain some who I was only meeting for the first time. But I was wondering where my favourite Team Dodgy running buddies were. Neil managed to pass me first but Carolyn K., Marla, and Chad were still to be seen. Maybe they got caught in the Timbits vortex provided by crew and Diez Vista Race Director extraordinaire Wendy Montgomery at Skyline. I was stuck in there for a couple of minutes myself. And I’m sure Carolyn was interested in taking her time since she and Neil had completed the 55 mile Cateran Race in Scotland the weekend prior. On that note, Karl Jensen had also done a big one that weekend: the 100 mile Pigtails Challenge in Renton, Washington. And I have no doubt that everyone else had put in some big training runs leading up to the V100 not the least of which was Sammy’s fantastic 19th place finish at the Vancouver Marathon in May.

Right from the start of my run I was concerned about my feet. They’ve never given me too much trouble but I decided to try some new runners this year. They worked out okay in training a few times but I hadn’t tried them for any considerable distance yet. I taped my feet in anticipation of problems and I’m glad I did. The pain on my toes and bottom of my feet had become quite severe and I was in the process of making my mind up to not continue past Cleveland Dam. With sore quads and knees my day would end at 75 km (18:51:00) and one more lesson learned the hard way. The best part is that I got my unique V100 experience and had a fantastic first 50 km. Love the night. Love the mud. But perhaps it was the excess amount of water on the trail that was part of the feet problem I had. It was a wet one as usual at this time of year. I was able to see my group come through Cleveland Dam and Helen gave me a ride home eventually. Then sleep.

Eventually I heard that Sammy knocked it out of the park once again: a new course record in 14:06. How does he do it? At the post dinner he mentioned that this year he didn’t get lost and didn’t doddle at all. I’ve tried that before and it didn’t work for me quite as well. Hmmm. First timers Spencer and Chris were steady and strong, finishing slightly ahead of another first timer, minimalist Eric, who came in with repeat offenders Jackie and Ken who all appear to have completed unscathed. Spencer told me that the last few miles were a massive effort for him to break 20 hours and it worked. He thanked me, “for a great if not painful event.” My pleasure Chris. Sam’s support crew person Miyuki was glad to hear from me when I called her in the morning trying to track Sam down. She said he got lost repeatedly but was determined to finish. For Sam to make it through on his own with that much difficulty earns him the ‘extra tough’ award for this year. It’s hard enough to finish when you know the route well let alone wander off many times. (Hey I warned you all about that didn’t I?) And last but not least, if everyone could have performed as well as second time finisher Kyndra then we would all have something to be proud of. Kyndra knocked 4 hours off her 2012 time and did so without a really ugly blood blister on her foot this time. Kyndra had some fantastic pacers as well. Thanks to all who helped keep our runners safe and sound out there and a shout out to Claire and Danielle for tagging along to see what it was all about and post some Tweets too.

(photo at right is Kyndra finishing with a 100 km personal best)

Close finishers were Dave and John. Dave blew a tire on Fromme and had to make his way out in the dark after a major stumble that caused his headlamp to disintegrate and one of his favourite blue hats to disappear. If you find his hat please secure its return or wear it proudly. John was a steady competitor as always but once again skipped the big climb back up Black Mountain. He’s amazing. He’s chatty. We’re lucky to have John among us and still going strong. John said, “that’s one of the best night runs I’ve ever had.” Considering all the big runs he’s done, including several 100 milers, that’s saying something. Take note that John’s wife and crew, Linda, gets the award for grossest injury during the V100: she fell at her home driveway to split her chin open and got five stitches. Ouch. I heard lots of blood was involved. Crewing comes with a price apparently.

Women’s course record holder Carolyn G. spent a relaxing day with Shem, both completing 75km as planned. Thanks to both for joining us in the fun once again. Neil found that after a kind act of avoiding a lady on the trail and whacking his knee he was not able to properly mount a return trip from Nelson Canyon. His whole group decided wisely to stop after 50km and head back to Maple Ridge after a meal and a rest. Michael, Sean and Karl all came up short but for smart reasons I’m sure. The V100 course continues to shatter hopes and dreams and keep it real year after year. Michael said he needed to walk the last 5 km after re-injuring his hip on Hollyburn Chute but he wants to give it a go again. Sean felt he didn’t have it in him this year. Karl, being one of Canada’s most prolific ultra-runners, gets a bye on this one. Thanks for being out there with us and passing on your experience and vast knowledge as always.

The post event dinner on Sunday was held at Two Lions Public House in North Vancouver - thanks to host Kendra and the new owners for having us and providing some complimentary beer to the thirsty travelers. Many showed up to share their stories and give plans of future adventures. I promised all that I would be holding a tenth V100 in 2014 and that they didn’t have a choice this time. But I was asking the group about their preferred V100 start time and was curious about the starting point for next year. Personally I think starting in Nelson Canyon would be an interesting alternative but that was met with a round of harrumphs. However it seems the start time is open for adjustment. Maybe 6:00 a.m.?

I also advised one and all at the dinner that there would certainly be one significant change. After living quite comfortably in Lynn Valley for almost all of my 51 happy years I’ve made the decision to move to Kamloops. I start work there on June 24 and will be very happy to be sharing the next phase of my life with Lynette. Some of you have met her and I hope you all get to meet her soon. I’ll be down and around the North Shore of Vancouver off and on. I’m addicted to our trails and there’s lots of Bagging still to be done. Please be sure to look me up in Kamloops when you’re spending time there or passing through. My time with Club Fat Ass and all the new friends I've made with trail running has been some of the very best times of my life. Thanks to all those I've met for helping me make it great. And a very special thanks to Ean and Sibylle for creating the club and keeping it going strong.

For all those who continue to ask us why we do this, it was summed up succinctly by one of the support runners and first timer on the BP Trail as well as a 50 km finisher. Candy said, “I don’t want or like easy.” Yup, that sums it up for me.

Thanks again to all that participated and good luck with training for the next big and unique thing in your lives.

Craig Moore

Event Host, Club Fat Ass Vancouver 100                                                                              

(photo at right are the unclaimed finisher crests and the sign-in sheet)

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Photos should be uploaded to Flickr, added to the CFA Flickr group and tagged with Vancouver1002013 Vancouver100 ClubFatAssEvents ClubFatAssEvents2013.  All photos tagged properly and added to the CFA Flickr pool will automatically appear in the slideshow posted here after the event.   

Post Event Survey. Please give us your feedback via this brief survey: 
http://www.clubfatass.com/events/Vancouver100/posteventsurvey 

Results:

At Eagle Bluffs Friday afternoon May 31 (Craig Moore and Deb Schmidt - pacer). Getting a head start on things after starting in Nelson Canyon at 3:09 pm. As always, a beautiful view when the clouds are away. Deb made it to Deep Cove as planned and Craig stopped after 75 km at Cleveland Dam.

 

The 2013 finisher's crest. Well earned for those few that made it 100 km. 

 

 

 

  Vancouver 100 (The Double) All-time:            
                Finishing    
      Starters Finishers Year New Repeats Rate Male Female
  100km   17 8 2013 4 4 47.1% 6 2
  100km   11 7 2012 3 4 63.6% 5 2
  100km   16 9 2011 5 4 56.3% 7 2
  100km   10 8 2010 7 1 80.0% 6 2
  100km   5 2 2009 1 1 40.0% 1 1
  100km   15 8 2008 4 4 53.3% 7 1
  100km   8 4 2007 2 2 50.0% 3 1
  100km   11 6 2006 5 1 54.5% 6  
  100km   7 7 2005 7   100.0% 7  
  Total   100 59 9 38 21 59.0% 48 11
  Average   11.1 6.6   4.2 2.3 60.5% 5.3 1.2

 

  2013 Vancouver 100 Results:
  Name Distance Time Points
  Hassan Lotfi-Pour 100km 14:06:00+ 2
  Spencer Sheinin 100km 19:58:51 2
  Chris Cochrane 100km 19:58:51 2
  Eric Rannaud 100km 20:09:00 2
  Jackie Muir 100km 20:09:00 2
  Ken Legg 100km 20:09:00 2
  Sam Chiu 100km 27:06:00 2
  Kyndra Moeller 100km 28:22:00 2
         
  Dave Berg 85km 17:52:00 2
  John Machray 80km 19:00:00 1
  Carolyn Goluza 75km 13:40:00 2
  Hashem (Shem) Sharifi 75km 13:40:00 2
  Michael Senior 75km 12:56:00 2
  Craig Moore 75km 18:51:00 2+2**+1*
  Sean Lavin 63km 15:00:00 2
  Erik Bjorklund 60km 9:13:00 1
  Neil Ambose 50km 9:15:00 2
  Karl Jensen 50km 12:09:00 2
  Carolyn King 50km 13:45:00 2
  Chad Allen 50km 13:45:00 2
  Marla  Weinheimer 50km 13:45:00 2
  Candy Scheifele 50km   2
  Paul Schrimpf 50km   2
  Paige Morrow 50km   1
  Laddie Hannam 41km 7:30:00 2
  Brent Seal 40km   2
  Paul  Dhillon 25km 5:10:00 2
  Michael Wardas 15km 2:30:00 1
  Sibylle Tinsel 10km   2
  James Clarke custom   2
         
  + new course record  
  ** event host  
  * garbage pickup  

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2012 Vancouver 100

2 June 2012 - Starter Photo in Deep Cove

Event Report: coming soon

Photos should be uploaded to Flickr, added to the CFA Flickr group and tagged with Vancouver1002012 Vancouver100 ClubFatAssEvents ClubFatAssEvents2012.  All photos tagged properly and added to the CFA Flickr pool will automatically appear in the slideshow posted here after the event.   


Post Event Survey. Please give us your feedback via this brief survey: 
http://www.clubfatass.com/events/Vancouver100/posteventsurvey 

Results:

First Last Distance Time Points
         
Hassan Lotfi-Pour 100km 14:35+ 2
Michael Wardas 100km 18:20 2
Kerry Ward 110km** 18:58 2
Pamela Keck 100km 20:41 2
Sean Lavin 100km*** 24:14 2
Simon Le Pine 100km*** 24:17 2
Kyndra Moeller 100km 32:28++ 2
         
Julie Flynn 87km 18:40 2
Suzanne  Johnson 87km 18:40 2
Joshua Barringer 75km 14:10 2
Shem Sharifi 75km 14:51 2
Ward Beemer 75km   2
David Crerar 50km 8:24 2
Neil Ambrose 50km   2
Chad Allen 50km   2
Dave Berg 38km   1
Carolyn King 25km   2
Sibylle Tinsel custom 2:25 2+1*
Rían Ó Maol Chonaire custom 1:06 2
Laddie Hannam custom   2
Liza Flemming custom   2
Andy Healey pacer   2
Dana Samis pacer   2
Ean Jackson pacer   2
Ray Levasseur pacer   2
Adam Way pacer   2
Nelson   crew   1
Ian   crew   1
Doug   crew   1
Craig Moore Event Host 2
         
+ course record      
++ course record      
* garbage point      
** 9th place finish, Ambleside Masters Mile, 5:30
*** to Horseshoe Bay Terminal and back  
         

 

There will be several pacers and crew tweeting runners locations and conditions.  Please join the conversation, Twitter hashtag #Van100


 

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All Time Records and Statistics

 

Vancouver 100 (The Double) All-time records:
  Distance   Starters Finishers Year New Repeats Finishing Rate Male Female
  100km   11 7 2012 3 4 63.6% 5 2
  100km   16 9 2011 5 4 56.3% 7 2
  100km   10 8 2010 7 1 80.0% 6 2
  100km   5 2 2009 1 1 40.0% 1 1
  100km   15 8 2008 4 4 53.3% 7 1
  100km   8 4 2007 2 2 50.0% 3 1
  100km   11 6 2006 5 1 54.5% 6  
  100km   7 7 2005 7   100.0% 7  
  Total   83 51 8 34 17 61.4% 42 9
  Average   10.4 6.4 8 4.3 2.1 62.2% 5.3 1.1
                     
  Name   Distance Time Year Finish > Notes      
1 Hassan Lotfi-Pour M 100km 14:35:00 2012 2 > men's 100km record  
2 Randy Hunter M 96km 14:48:00 2005 1 > men's 96km course record, first male finisher (plus one in year 2000 pre-V100)
3 Ryan Conroy M 100km 14:54:40 2010 1        
4 Bill Dagg M 100km 15:07:00 2008 2        
5 Rod Hatfull M 100km 15:52:00 2006 1        
6 Colin Freeland M 100km 16:20:00 2008 1        
7 Kamren Farr M 100km 16:29:47 2010 1        
8 Carolyn Goluza F 100km 17:00:00 2010 1 > women's 100km record  
9 Hassan Lotfi-Pour M 100km 17:16:00 2011 1        
10 Kerry Ward M 100km 17:44:00 2011 1        
11 Kerry Ward M 110km 18:58:00 2012 2        
12 Bill Dagg M 100km 17:48:00 2006 1        
13 Dan Probst M 100km 17:48:00 2006 1        
14 Michael Wardas M 100km 17:57:00 2008 1        
15 Neil Ambrose M 100km 17:57:00 2008 1        
16 Michael Wardas M 100km 18:20:00 2012 4 > most 100km finishes (plus one in year 2000 pre-V100)
17 Rob MacDonald M 100km 18:28:00 2006 2        
18 Rob MacDonald M 96km 18:45:00 2005 1        
19 Glenn Pace M 100km 18:59:00 2006 1        
20 Geoff Palmer M 100km 18:59:00 2006 1        
21 David Crerar M 100km 18:59:00 2007 1        
22 Michael Wardas M 100km 19:01:00 2011 3        
23 Jackie Muir F 100km 19:15:00 2010 1        
24 Ken Legg M 100km 19:15:00 2010 1        
25 Wade Repta M 100km 19:15:00 2010 1        
26 Glenn Pace M 100km 19:52:00 2007 2        
27 Ken Legg M 100km 19:55:00 2011 2        
28 Michael Wardas M 100km 20:15:00 2010 2        
29 Randy Duncan M 100km 20:15:00 2010 1        
30 Pamela Keck F 100km 20:41:00 2012 1        
31 Gilles Barbeau M 100km 22:51:00 2005 1        
32 Karl Jensen M 96km 22:51:00 2005 1        
33 Craig Moore M 96km 22:51:00 2005 1        
34 Ron Adams M 96km 22:51:00 2005 1        
35 John Machray M 96km 22:51:00 2005 1        
36 Karl Jensen M 100km 23:35:00 2009 3        
37 Kirsten Ramage F 100km 23:35:00 2009 1        
38 Sean Lavin M 100km 23:54:00 2011 1        
39 Sean Lavin M 100km 24:14:00 2012 2        
40 Simon Le Pine M 100km 24:17:00 2012 1        
41 Karl Jensen M 100km 24:40:00 2008 2        
42 Gilles Barbeau M 100km 24:40:00 2008 3        
43 Craig Moore M 100km 24:40:00 2008 2        
44 Gilles Barbeau M 100km 25:56:00 2007 2        
45 Sylvie Jorger F 100km 25:56:00 2007 1 > first 100km female finisher  
46 Craig Moore M 100km 26:35:00 2011 3 > most V100 events (tied-7)  
47 Carolyn King F 100km 26:54:00 2011 1        
48 Marla Weinheimer F 100km 26:54:00 2011 1        
49 Neil Ambrose M 100km 26:54:00 2011 2        
50 Jess Dagg (Basil) F 100km 28:04:00 2008 1        
51 Kyndra Moeller F 100km 32:28:00 2012 1 > best value record    
                     
  Average 96/100km time (M/F) 20:56:51            
                     
  Ryan Conroy M 92km 13:48:00 2011          
  Suzanne  Johnson F 87km 18:40:00 2012          
  Julie Flynn F 87km 18:40:00 2012          
  Brian Vanoene M 87km   2008          
  John Machray M 87km   2006          
  Michael Wardas M 85km 17:10:00 2006          
  Simon Le Pine M 85km 21:00:00 2011          
  Shannon Wilford F 85km   2008          
  Dana  Samis F 83km 17:30:00 2011          
  John Machray M 80km 10:39:00 2010          
  John Machray M 80km 17:45:00 2011   > most V100 events (tied-7)  
  Baldwin Lee M 80km 19:00:00 2010          
                     
  Dave Berg M 78km   2009          
  John Machray M 76km 18:00:00 2007          
  Gilles Barbeau M 76km   2006          
  Bill Dagg M 75km 14:02:00 2010          
  Joshua Barringer M 75km 14:10:00 2012          
  Shem Sharifi M 75km 14:51:00 2012          
  Dave Berg M 75km 16:56:00 2011          
  Sylvie Jorger F 75km 17:57:00 2008          
  Ward Beemer M 75km   2012          
  Tim Wiens M 67km   2006          
  Rick Arikado M 64km 11:57:00 2011          
  Tim Wiens M 63km 12:39:00 2007          
  Gilles Barbeau M 63km   2009          
  John Machray M 63km   2009          
  Baldwin Lee M 60km 12:18:00 2009          
                     
  Ryan Conroy M 52km 10:44:00 2007          
  Loger Aure M 52km 11:57:00 2007          
  David Crerar M 50km 07:07:00 2010          
  Michael Spagnut M 50km 07:50:00 2008          
  David Crerar M 50km 08:12:00 2011          
  David Crerar M 50km 08:24:00 2012          
  David Crerar M 50km 08:26:00 2008          
  Monty Watts M 50km 08:30:00 2008          
  Shem Sharifi M 50km 09:18:00 2011          
  deavah yerxa F 50km 10:10:00 2011          
  Chase Mueller M 50km 10:15:00 2011          
  Bill Dagg M 50km 10:30:00 2007          
  Chad Hyson M 50km 10:38:10 2010          
  Kirtsen Ramage F 50km 10:38:10 2010          
  Karl Jensen M 50km 10:39:00 2010          
  reza ghazizadeh M 50km 10:45:00 2011          
  Eric Rannaud M 50km 10:50:00 2011          
  Karl Jensen M 50km 10:50:00 2011          
  Carolyn King F 50km 10:56:00 2010          
  Heather Urquhart F 50km 10:56:00 2010          
  Neil Ambrose M 50km 10:56:00 2010          
  Eileen Bistrisky F 50km 15:09:00 2010          
  Neil Ambrose M 50km   2012          
  Chad Allen M 50km   2012          
  John Machray M 50km   2008          
                     
  Liza Flemming F 42km 09:00:00 2011          
  Ron Adams M 42km   2006          
  Berglind H. F 40km   2006          
  John Barron M 38km 07:52:00 2008          
  Ron Adams M 38km 07:52:00 2008          
  Monty Watts M 38km 09:14:00 2007          
  Craig Moore M 38km 09:44:00 2007          
  Dave Berg M 38km   2012          
  Patricia Jensen F 38km   2008          
  Randy Rankin M 38km   2008          
  Ean Jackson M 37km 06:30:00 2010          
  Jess Dagg F 37km 08:30:00 2010          
  Desmond Mott M 35km 04:19:00 2007          
  Desmond Mott M 33km 04:05:00 2008          
  Desmond Mott M 33km 04:28:00 2010          
  Laddie Hannam F 33km 06:30:00 2010          
  Laddie Hannam F 33km 06:45:00 2011          
  Laddie Hannam F 33+3km 6:50+0:50 2009          
  Desmond Mott M 32km 04:20:00 2009          
  Chad Hyson M 32km 04:40:00 2009          
  Jonathan Weresch M 32km 05:42:00 2010          
  Desmond Mott M 32km   2006          
  Henry Wang M 30km 07:00:00 2011          
                     
  Craig Moore M 27km 05:39:00 2009          
  Gord Thompson M 27km   2009          
  Rob MacDonald M 26km 04:30:00 2008          
  Sarah Liljefors F 25km 04:07:00 2011          
  Ron Adams M 25km 04:20:00 2007          
  Kyla Adams F 25km 04:40:00 2008          
  Craig Moore M 25km 06:00:00 2010          
  Kelly Corday F 25km 06:00:00 2010          
  Liza Flemming F 25km 06:00:00 2010          
  Carolyn King F 25km   2012          
  Ean Jackson M 25km   2011          
  KO Turner M 25km   2011          
  Rod Hatfull M 25km   2008          
                     
  Elke Bauer F 24km   2006          
  Steven Lee M 24km   2006          
  desmond mott M 18km 02:00:00 2011          
  Killaine Sharman F 18km 02:40:00 2010          
  Rod Hatfull M 13km   2007          
  Ron Adams M 12.5km   2009          
  Bryce Adams M 12.5km   2009          
  Chris Benn M 12.5km   2006          
  Sibylle Tinsel F 10km 02:20:00 2009          
  Ean Jackson M 10km   2009          
                     
  Chad Hyson M custom 01:00:00 2008          
  Rian Ó Maol Chonaire M custom 01:06:00 2012          
  Sibylle Tinsel F custom 01:25:00 2006          
  Faith Wells F custom 01:25:00 2006          
  Sibylle Tinsel F custom 01:33:00 2011          
  Ean Jackson M custom 01:35:00 2008          
  Sibylle Tinsel F custom 01:45:00 2010          
  Craig Moore M custom 01:45:00 2006          
  Sibylle Tinsel F custom 02:25:00 2012          
  Pat Barry F custom 02:30:00 2006          
  Michele Sherstan F custom 02:30:00 2006          
  Claudia Bullington F custom 02:30:00 2006          
  Sibylle Tinsel F custom 03:10:00 2007          
  Pat Barry F custom 03:10:00 2007          
  Judy F custom 03:10:00 2007          
  Ean Jackson M custom   2012          
  Laddie Hannam F custom   2012          
  Adam Way M custom   2012          
  Liza Flemming F custom   2012          
  Pamela Keck F custom   2011          
  Baldwin Lee M custom   2006          

 

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2011 Vancouver 100

4 June 2011 - Starter Photo in Deep Cove

2011 Vancouver 100 Event Report 

"I've done lots of 100 milers and for some reason this course really tears you up ... it's harder than most 100 milers." Randy Hunter, echoed by Rob MacDonald, 2005 Vancouver 100 finishers and experienced ultra trail runners.

 

“Ran the Vancouver 100 half … toughest 50km course in North America.” Tweeted by Chase Mueller from Seattle.

 

“Finished #Vancouver100 in 23:54. Ran most of it with @high_camp. Thanks bro, for a long amazing day. I’m going back to bed for a week!” Tweeted by Sean Lavin, first- timer.

 

The seventh running of the Vancouver 100 is now complete. (Thanks to John Machray for pointing out it was number 7 and not 6 as I said in my post run stupor at the after party.) This one was as epic as all the others and no less difficult. In fact it may have been the most challenging yet with more snow than ever before, more sunshine to distract us with magnificent scenery and views, and a superb field of ultra-athletes to challenge us.

The day started very early in Deep Cove with a group of roughly two dozen runners, about half of who were planning on completing the full 100 km distance to Nelson Canyon near Horseshoe Bay and back. After a Spring full of cold and wet training days, with more water than usual on our muddy and rocky trails, and up to 10 feet of snow depth still lingering in the hills, having our day start with clear skies and warm temperatures put smiles on everyone involved including all the crew helpers that would be with us throughout the event. With my run briefing done and starter photo taken, we were off and down the road to the Baden Powell trailhead at 5:06 a.m. Ryan Conroy set a blistering pace with Sammy (Hassan Lotfi-Pour) and his pacer Kerry Ward in close pursuit. Mike Wardas set out on what turned into his fourth double-crossing of the BP Trail (the first one was in 2000, pre CFA days). Experienced mountaineer and uber-Bagger Ken Legg was in it for his second finish. And first sign-up this year, Sean Lavin, began with the idea of completing the event as the only option on his mind. My group of Neil Ambrose, Carolyn King and Marla Weinheimer preferred the slow and steady approach so we got settled in at the rear and held that position with dogged determination and proud persistence strongly throughout the day and night and the next morning.
 
In recent years, the Vancouver 100 has been attracting a small number of newcomers to the North Shore trails. This year we had 50 km sign-ups Chase Mueller and KO Turner from Seattle. I typically give a severe warning to unsuspecting adventure hungry types that the Baden Powell Trail will chew up and spit out the best of runners not to mention those with little knowledge of the route. However, these guys slipped under my radar and surprised me at the start with a simple question of, “Any suggestions how we can get back to Deep Cove once we reach the half way point?” Thankfully some of the other runners chimed in because I didn’t have a great answer for that, given that Nelson Canyon is a bit removed from things. As it turned out, I believe KO dropped at Cleveland Dam after 25 km and Chase stuck with some of the other participants to find his way to Nelson Canyon. Well done guys. By the way, they got me concerned again when I found them in the Lynn Headwaters area looking over a map of the BP.
 
It’s always fun to know what kind of wildlife we see during the day and night during the Vancouver 100. I seem to be the only runner with anything of note this year. It turns out that after being on the North Shore trails for the last 30 years, the only two times I have ever seen bears were during the Vancouver 100. The first was in 2005 about twenty minutes into the event. The second was this year in Nelson Canyon about ten minutes after my start on the second half. There he was, 15 feet off the trail, rattling the bushes in fear of me (haha), and me hiking my way up in comfortably oblivious thoughts of tackling Black Mountain once again. A loud whistle from me chased him off with my concerns then jumping to Neil, Carolyn and Marla who would be heading up the trail in a few minutes as well. But since the bear wasn’t thrilled to be around me, and the other three runners were staying together, I wasn’t too concerned. Of course we all heard the Grouse drumming throughout the event but some runners may have also gotten to hear the hoot of an owl as we did, loud and clearly, in the middle of the dark night, very near to the trail at Skyline Road.
 
Of course, some of the Foolish suspects were out for their Vancouver 100 “training” run. John Machray and Karl Jensen have both participated several times and always bring their own high quality brand of discussion and encouragement to the party. Thanks to both of them for joining in once again. And thanks to the usual suspects Rick Arikado, Laddie Hannam, Baggermeister David Crerar, and Des Mott. As well as chief Fat Ass Sibylle Tinsel and most suspicious Fat Ass Ean Jackson for being there too – we all appreciate what you do for the club and in supporting us individually.
 
During the day, the snow was a big factor on our speed. We found the snow lingering on the Hollyburn Chute as we ascended to the big snow of the cross country ski runs. As my group was getting on to the fully snow covered ski runs, we came across a hiker named Andrew with a good sized pack who said he was on his way to Mt. Hanover. That came as a bit of a shock to me knowing how far away that was and wondering if he was simply going to hop on the Howe Sound Crest Trail and find his way through the deep snow. But he ended up gladly following me into the treed section off the ski runs of Hollyburn and on to Cypress Bowl where he intended to continue on the BP and down to Horseshoe Bay. Then, he said, he would get over to Lions Bay and head up to Hanover from there for a sleep in the Brunswick emergency shelter. But as he found out, the trail was not forgiving, nor the route finding. I saw him again, talking with Neil, Carolyn and Marla, at Eagleridge Bluffs. He spent a good long while there soaking up the sun and enjoying the amazingly spectacular and clear view of everything including Mt. Baker and Vancouver Island. Not sure if he ultimately went on to Hanover though.
 
Many thanks go out to all the crews and pacers. As I mentioned at the post event dinner held at Mosquito Creek Bar & Grill, without our crews this event is not possible or at least not as enjoyable and their time and efforts are hugely appreciated. And even though the pacers get to join in the run and fun, they too help us in ways that are immeasurable. So, many thanks to all who helped the runners achieve their goals. And if you would like to have your crew’s or pacer’s names on the Results list please let me know. It’s a bit tough for me to know for certain who ended up being out there for all of you.
 
Congratulations go to those runners that trained hard for the full meal deal but came up short. After all, the hard part isn’t necessarily the event itself but the training for months, doing the long weekly runs of 5 to 10 hours at a time under dark and wet skies in cold and tough conditions. Dana Samis had a knee that wasn’t agreeing with her and finally had to call it a day after about 80 km on her first attempt. Dave Berg blew a tire coming down through the British Properties on the way back and limped in to Cleveland Dam where he had to stop short on his second attempt. Dave told me that other than the wipe-out that compromised his knee, he was feeling great and I know he was setting a very good pace. Simon Le Pine brought lots of backwoods experience to the trail but cut it short at 85 km and promises to be back next year. Reza Ghazizadeh was one of the runners that I was concerned about from the beginning. Reza signed up for the 100 km, knowingly or not, and after a short chat at the start line he told me he wasn’t too sure about the route on the west side of the BP. But he assured me that he would stick with someone that knew the way and somehow convinced me that all would be well. As it turned out he finished the first half with Karl and John and seemed to enjoy the day as much or more than the rest of us. And Ryan Conroy gave it his best effort while leading the pack the whole day. But, eventually having some nutrition issues (14 packs of Cliff Blocks can do that to you), he packed it in at Riverside Drive with less than 10 km to go.
 
I have a final thank you to my fellow runners and friends, Neil, Carolyn and Marla, and our pacers Liza and Wendy, and our one-person highly dedicated crew of Vicky. Thanks for all the training runs and for keeping it fun. You guys are amazing and very dedicated to the art of putting in lots and lots and lots of both road and trail kilometres. Neil was training for the West Highland Way 153 km race in Scotland in two weeks with Carolyn there to be his faithful sherpa this time. Good luck Neil. And Liza was preparing for her first Knee Knacker this year when I know she’ll do very well. And I must mention that the burgers and fries that Wendy brought us at the ¾ mark were awesome along with the cinnamon buns that Marla whipped up for us.
 
The big question remains, as always at this time, will we do it again? Mike and I have had the same dark thoughts about notorious Black Mtn. I’m sure and no doubt we’ve both many times decided 100% that we will never do it again. And the death defying snow bridge crossing of the frigid waters of a deep and fast rushing creek on Hollyburn Mountain that pacer Rune Melcher punched through brought us endless concerns through training and on event day. That alone is enough to say stop the insanity. But the wildlife and pure distance factors don’t seem to deter anyone. And then there’s the collective agreement that the Vancouver 100 remains one of, if not the hardest, 100 km trail runs anywhere and for some reason that makes it the best and most enjoyable challenge going. Not to mention that I think it gets easier the more I do it – not saying I’m going again though. So the answer is easy: when we hold the event again, I know there will be people to do it. So, good luck with training for next year.

“From either side, and for any reason, getting to the top of Black Mountain is a very good thing.” Vancouver 100 Event Host, Craig Moore.

 

Photos should be uploaded to Flickr, added to the CFA Flickr group and tagged with Vancouver1002011 Vancouver100 ClubFatAssEvents ClubFatAssEvents2011.  All photos tagged properly and added to the CFA Flickr pool will automatically appear in the slideshow posted here after the event. 
 

 

 

Post Event Survey. Please give us your feedback via this brief survey: 
http://www.clubfatass.com/events/Vancouver100/posteventsurvey 

Results:  Please let us if there are mistakes or missing times/distances.

First Name Last Name Event Time Pts
Hassan Lotfi-Pour 100km 17:16 2
Kerry ward 100km 17:44 2
Michael Wardas 100km 19:01 2
Ken Legg 100km 19:55 2
Sean Lavin 100km 23:54 2
Craig Moore 100km 26:35 2+2**+1*
Carolyn King 100km 26:54 2
Marla Weinheimer 100km 26:54 2
Neil Ambrose 100km 26:54 2
         
Ryan Conroy 92km 13:48 2
Dana  Samis 83km 17:30 2
John Machray 80km 17:45 2
Dave Berg 75km 16:56 2
Rick Arikado 64km 11:57 2
Shem Sharifi 50km 9:18 2
Karl Jensen 50km 10:50 2
reza ghazizadeh 50km 10:45 2
Chase Mueller 50km 10:15 2
David Crerar 50km 8:12 2
deavah yerxa 50km 10:10 2
Eric Rannaud 50km 10:50 2
Liza Flemming 42km 9:00 2
Laddie Hannam 33km 6:45 2
Henry Wang 30km 7:00 2
Sarah Liljefors 25km 4:07 2
KO Turner 25km   2
Ean Jackson 25km   2
Simon Le Pine 85km  21:00 2
Pamela Keck custom   2
desmond mott custom - 18km 2:00 2+1
Sibylle Tinsel custom 1:33 2+1*
Wendy Montgomery pacer   1
Vicky Forsyth crew   1
Helen Phillips crew   1
         
Elizabeth Tod     -1
Tom Lucas     -1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Like last year, we'll encourage participants, crew and spectators to tweet whereabouts and news about the runners. Hashtag "#Vancouver100" on Twitter.  You can also post on the CFA Facebook page and of course, as always via comments below.

 

 

 

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2010 - Vancouver 100


5 June 2010 - Starter Photo in Deep Cove

(standing) Ryan, Chad, Ken, Kirsten, Des, Jackie, Karl, Wade, Randy, Carolyn, Eileen, Laddie, Kamren, Jonathon, John, (kneeling) Bill, Mike

Elaine and Tara setting off at Nelson Creek at about 5:45 am.

Report: 

I'm rather fond of the Vancouver 100. This being the fifth year of the 100km event, plus one year as The Double 96km, it has become the new focal point for my running year. And I have the best seat in the house getting to know everyone and help them understand the event as much as possible before it starts. There were people from all over: Edmonton, Victoria, Burnaby, Maple Ridge, Vancouver and North Vancouver. And it seems to be taking on a life of it's own I must say.

A few unique things happened this year too. The weather was uniquely wonderful: cool, no rain after many rainy days, and not too hot during the afternoon. And in spite of a heavy snowfall on the tops of the local mountains in the early spring, the snow has been melting fast and furiously lately resulting in a reasonably quick course: although there was still tons of water and even a good helping of mud to be found on event day.

We also had several people in two different groups start early in the day from the western end at Nelson Canyon Park. This was a first, not to mention that Eileen completed her first 50km hike and her first contiguous crossing of the Baden Powell Trail. And, along with BP veterans Neil and Carolyn, Heather did her very first full BP traverse in preparation for the upcoming Knee Knacker. I'm sure it will be a piece of cake for her now. Did I mention that Eileen also upheld a uniquely CFA tradition? Her and her hiking buddy did a couple of loop-d-loops on Hollyburn Mountain to add a few km's here and there.

Speaking of which, as I sat at the 3/4 mark later on with Sibylle, Olivia and others, the biggest topic of discussion coming from the runners was how many people were wandering all over Black Mountain and other points west of the Dam. I'm not really surprised about that but I am sorry to hear so much time was spent on custom sections rather than on the monster course that is long enough already. If I heard right, just before the halfway mark, Ryan took himself all the way down to the very bottom of the BP Trail before figuring out he needed to go through to the Whyte Lake trail and down to the parking lot where crews were waiting. I wish I could give you extra credit for that Ryan but I'm afraid it's not an unusual situation for this event.

Speaking of which, I must say that you don't really get what you pay for. The Vancouver 100 is billed as a double crossing of the Baden Powel Trail. But what it really is, is a few minutes of road running, followed by the BP Trail that has had some major changes to it lately, then just before turning around there is a bit of really nice trail through old growth forest, then a turn around and back up that nice bit and on to the BP again for a direct trip back to Deep Cove as long as you don't get lost (again). And to top it off ya gotta run down the road in the Cove at the end and tag the fire hydrant at the parking lot. That isn't exactly a double BP but it is all that and more - and pretty darn close to 100km that way too.

And another thing: what about the bit around Lynn Headwaters? Wade, and I think Mike also, pointed out that the BP goes over the Lynn Canyon Suspension Bridge and down the road as opposed to over the pipeline bridge and down the Varley Trail. Okay, so the route instructions aren't exactly complete for this event but I am willing to accept either method of getting through Lynn Valley. I'm used to the Varley route but the precise BP route is a touch shorter I suppose. If you're out for the course record it matters. If you're out to fill your boots then you might like the longer value version.

It's hard to tell how much of an effect the weather had on participant turnout but it may have helped our two new course record holders burn up the course. How do you beat a mild 11C at 5:00 am, heavy cloud turning to light cloud through the day, no rain, all turning to perfectly average temperatures during the day of about 17c with quite easy to find sunshine? I'm sure all the runners didn't mind a bit. Of course it gave the out-of -towners more reason to glow about the course and the day without knowing how much rain we've put up with in training the last few months since the Olympics ended.

We were also uniquely connected this year. Besides the Club Fat Ass website, we were able to use the CFA page on Facebook and use Twitter. Not that I live in the dark ages or anything but Saturday marked my first foray into Tweeting. And once Sibylle helped me out with it I couldn't be stopped. How great was that and so cool that it was showing instantly on the CFA website. Thanks to everyone for staying in touch and letting me know when you were finished.

What wasn't unique this year was the silence we experienced at the start line and the intrigue by crew members of what was yet to come. All eyes and ears were focused on the run briefing as runners began to unleash their energy in the last moments before starting. When it's 100km that is about to be taken on, the readiness level is only dampened by the early hour of the morning, but, the focus is ultra clear. And I could tell that the few crew members that were there were more than ready and willing to watch the runners take on the pain and determination of the day.

As for the run itself, it went pretty smoothly. I must thank all the crews and pacers for taking very good care of their runners. As we all know, without crew on a run of this size we have nothing. And the pacers may have gotten more than they bargained for, especially Mirabelle, as Ryan charged on through the second half testing her speed and endurance. I think Ryan said that 50km was twice the distance that Mirabelle had ever done before and yet she stuck with it as Ryan raced for a strong finish toward Deep Cove with an ever-faster pace. And, since Ryan Conroy is now the fastest finisher on the 100km course, I have declared him the course record holder. That's an amazing accomplishment for sure. As is the run put in by the new woman's course record holder, Carolyn Goluza. In fact we had two women, Jackie Muir included, that beat the previous women's record. Very nice.

It was great seeing the V100 regulars out there, Karl, John, Mike, Ean, Sibylle, Baldwin, Bill, Jess, Chad, Kirsten, Neil, David, Des, Laddie, and all the others. Thanks to all of you for supporting this event and making it special for me.

A personal thanks to my Saturday night running buddies that did the last quarter with me from Cleveland Dam to Deep Cove starting around 7:30 pm. It was a bit tough for Baldwin as he had munched his ankle earlier, but, it was easy for veteran Jess, and fun for Liza and night-newbie Kelly, and a pleasure for me finally getting a chance to run after being mellow and patient since getting up at 4:00 am.

So, I wonder who it will be next year? Are you ready for the hardest 100km trail run anywhere?

Craig

Photos should be uploaded to Flickr, added to the CFA Flickr group and tagged with Vancouver1002010 Vancouver100 ClubFatAssEvents ClubFatAssEvents2010.  All photos tagged properly and added to the CFA Flickr pool will automatically appear in the slideshow below:

Video:  Below is a video from the morning hours on the trail east of Mosquito Creek.

Post Event Survey. Please give us your feedback via this brief survey:
http://www.clubfatass.com/events/Vancouver100/posteventsurvey 

Results: Ryan took an early and determined lead with Kamren, Des and Mike in hot pursuit. It's a picture perfect day with cool temperatures but just right for running a nice long tough one. Looking for a high finisher rate today. Chad is running with Kirsten who looks like the woman to beat today: fast, happy and seemingly fresh at their first pass through Cleveland Dam. Some runners were quiet when I saw them at the first quarter check point, and yet others were alive with joy. And as usual John Machray was setting the pace for discussion and was surrounded by four young short groupies (grandchildren) and his wife Linda at Cleveland Dam: a nice boost to John's endless energy. Neil, Carolyn and Heather started their run from Nelson Canyon at about 9:15 am. Latecomer Bagger Crerar advised he will be doing the same with an afternoon start. It's never too late in the day to get in on the Vancouver 100!  

 

First Name Last Name Event   50km Finish   Points
               
Ryan Conroy 100km   7:09 14:54:40 ###   2
Kamren Farr 100km   8:16 16:29:47   2
Carolyn Goluza 100km   8:16 17:00:00 !!!   2
Jackie Muir 100km   8:42 19:15:00   2
Ken Legg 100km   8:42 19:15:00   2
Wade Repta 100km   8:42 19:15:00   2
Michael Wardas 100km   8:16 20:15:00   2
Randy Duncan 100km   8:16 20:15:00   2
               
John Machray 80km     10:39:00   1
Baldwin Lee 80km     19:00:00   2+1*
Bill Dagg 75km   8:16 14:02:00   2+1*+1***
Chad Hyson 50km     10:38:10   2
Kirsten Ramage 50km     10:38:10   2
Karl Jensen 50km     10:39:00   2
Carolyn King 50km     10:56:00   2
Heather Urquhart 50km     10:56:00   1
Neil Ambrose 50km     10:56:00   2
Eileen Bistrisky 50km     15:09:00   2
David Crerar 50km     7:07:00   1
Ean Jackson 37km     6:30:00   1+1***
Jess Dagg 37km     8:30:00   2+1*+1***
Desmond Mott 33km     4:28:00   2+1*
Laddie Hannam 33km     6:30:00   2
Jonathan Weresch 32km     5:42:00   2
Craig Moore 25km     6:00:00   2+2**+1*
Kelly Corday 25km     6:00:00   2+1*
Liza Flemming 25km     6:00:00   2+1*
Killaine Sharman 18km     2:40:00   1
Sibylle Tinsel custom     1:45:00   2+1*
               
Garth Campbell crew     (Carolyn G.)   1
Shem Sharifi crew     (Carolyn G.)   1
Jen Milton crew     (Jackie)   1
Scott Galloway crew     (Jackie)   1
Linda Machray crew     (John)   1
Karina Farr crew     (Kamren)   1
Kathryn Stanton crew     (Kamren)   1
Mark Stanton crew     (Kamren)   1
Lorraine Suomi crew     (Karl)   1
Barb Legg crew     (Ken)   1
Doug Cooper crew     (Ken,Jackie)   1
Peter Gaskill crew     (Kirsten, Chad)   1
Al Sherwood crew     (Michael)   1
Glenn Pace crew     (Michael)   1
Paul Wiggins crew     (Michael)   1
Wendy Montgomery crew     (Neil,Carolyn K.,Heather) 1
Lori Herron crew     (Randy)   1
Mirabelle Tinio pacer     (Ryan)   1
Olivia May crew     (Ryan)   1
Dom Repta crew     (Wade)   1
Wade's Girlfriend crew     (Wade)   1
Wade's Mom crew     (Wade,Jackie)   1
               
### 100km course record (previous record was 96km)    
!!! woman's course record          
* garbage point            
** event host            
*** crew/pacer            

 

Thanks everybody who participated in my little Twitter experiment.  The #Vancouver100 updates fed live to our website (see the feed below) were well received even by folks who had never set eyes on Twitter.... Sibylle



 

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2009- Year 5


6 June 2009 - Starter Photo

Report: 

2009 Vancouver 100 – Event Report
 
How do I put into words how great this event is and how much it affects the runners and the club? It is possible but daunting.
 
I’ve been involved with Club Fat Ass for many years, almost since the beginning. I stick with it because I get to do what I want (run on the local trails with old friends and make new friends). It’s easy to sign up for events and see clearly what I’m getting myself into before the Event Host says “go!” The challenge is ready and the purpose is obvious. So what is it about the Vancouver 100 that astounds me every year and makes it so different from the other events?
 
It’s freaking hard. Ya that better be obvious by now. But there are other very tough events that get put on that are special as well. So this means I have to be very careful about who comes along for the ride.
 
It’s also very local and thus very accessible. I get a couple of requests a year from people to do the run that have absolutely no clue how rough and tumble the Baden Powell course is over the 30 miles each way. Once I give them a dose of reality they kindly offer to train for a few more years before considering this event again.
 
I love doing it. Not just the running part. But getting people together that may or may not know each other and seeing what becomes of their lives and mindsets over two days. They are asked to push themselves to the limits both the runners and the crews. We’re looking out for people’s well being and their sanity of course. Their health part is a bit tricky since we aren’t necessarily professional caregivers but we do have a lot of collective experience at this stuff. And the mental part, well, that’s probably the biggest surprise each year. Those that you figure are totally up to the challenge may or may not make it intact. Those that you figure might not understand what it takes to complete the run come around and dramatically surprise you with their tenaciousness and determination. That’s the part I enjoy the most including in myself for my two finishes in 2005 and 2008.
 
The Vancouver 100 involves lots of people. Especially considering how few actually complete the course. Each runner is required to have a dedicated, 24-hour crew. If I get out there and run a section I try my best to still be around to help the crews and pick up the slack where required. And I know that lots of you are excited to read the reports and see the results. Hopefully we did okay to keep you up to date and excited about the finishes. Thank you very much to everyone that helped make this one a success no matter how little or much you did.
 
So, congratulations are in order. Karl Jensen finished the Vancouver 100 for the third time. This is the most anyone has done it (along with Gilles Barbeau’s three finishes in previous years). What’s best about Karl is that he knows his limits, he’s willing to test them and he’s more than willing to help a fellow runner. Way to go Karl and thank you for participating again. Our only other finisher out of five starters is Kirsten Ramage. Kirsten has been training with the Fools and proving how great a runner she has become. Only two other women have completed this course and in 2009 Kirsten set the new record for time. Amazing and fantastic Kirsten!
 
If I could change one thing about this year’s event I would have wished to be at the finish line when Karl and Kirsten arrived. My intentions were good but execution was sadly poor. I set my alarm and when it rang I promptly turned it off and went back to sleep after thinking there was no reason to get up at 3:30 am yet again. How terribly wrong that was. I can only hope they’ll forgive me because I’m sure it was a great finish.
 
Will it happen again in 2010? As we know, 2010 is a special year for Vancouver. I know there is interest in the 2010 Vancouver 100 already but it is a long way off. So much will happen between now and then including lots of special CFA events.
 
Make sure to keep training and having fun and be sure to tell people about the hardest 100km trail run anywhere.
 
Craig Moore


Photos should be uploaded to Flickr, added to the CFA Flickr group and tagged with Vancouver1002009 Vancouver100 ClubFatAssEvents.  Photos posted so far are here.

Post Event Survey. Please give us your feedback via this brief survey:
http://www.clubfatass.com/events/Vancouver100/posteventsurvey

Results:

 First Name  Last Name  Distance  Time  Points
 Karl  Jensen  100km  23:35  2+1*
 Kirsten  Ramage  100km  23:35  2+1* !!!
 Dave  Berg  77km  17:00 (10:57 1/2 way split)  2
 Gilles  Barbeau  63km  15:00 est  2
 John  Machray  63km  15:00 est  2
 Baldwin  Lee  60km  12:18  2+1**
 Laddie  Hannam  33+9km  6:50+0:50  2+1**
 Desmond  Mott  32km  4:20  2+1*
 Chad  Hyson  32km  4:40  2
 Craig  Moore  27km  5:39  2+2+1+1****
 Gord  Thompson  27km    1+1**
 Ron  Adams  12.5km    2
 Bryce  Adams  12.5km    2
 Sibylle  Tinsel  10km  2:20  2+1+1***
 Ean  Jackson  10km    1+1**
 Lorie  Alexander  dns    -1
 Barry  Hopkins  dns    -1
   
 Helen  Phillips  crew for Dave  1  
 Pano (& Gord)    crew for Dave  1  
 Shauna    crew for Kirsten  1  
 Linda  Machray  crew for John  1  
 Cathy  Adams  crew for Ron/Bryce  1  
 Lucinda  Iglesias  crew for Gilles  1  
 Doug  Keir  crew for Baldwin  1  
 Craig  Moore  crew for Karl/Gilles etc    
   
 *  garbage pick up  
 **  crew/pacer  
 ***  crew/pacer, garbage pick up  
 ****  event host, crew, garbage pick up  
 !!! women's course record  

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2008 - Year 4

Of 15 starters for the full 100 km we had 8 finish. That's the most out of 4 years. It was an incredible day on a slightly challenging course. Thanks to everyone for participating and especially the crews!

Name

Distance

Time

Pts

Distance /split times

Crew (1 pt each)
Bill Dagg

100 km

15:07

3

Full course 7:30/7:37 Pacers: Susan Reynolds, John Neels, Terry Bushnell; Crew: Nicki Decloux, Mike Bjelos
Colin Freeland

100 km

16:20

2

Full course John Freeland, Patricia Jensen
Michael Wardas

100 km

17:57

2

Full course Cheryl, Ethelyn
Neil Ambrose

100 km

17:57

2

Full course Carolyn, Marla
Karl Jensen

100 km

24:40

2

Full course /13:47 Lorraine
Gilles Barbeau

100 km

24:40

2

Full course /13:47 Lucinda
Craig Moore

100 km

24:40

3

Full course 10:53/13:47 Ethelyn
Jessica Bassil

100 km

28:04

2

Full course 12:00/16:04 Richard Rose, Baldwin, Sukhi, Michelle, Bill Dagg
Brian Vanoene

87 km

 

2

to Lynn Headwaters, pipeline bridge Daniel Probst
Shannon Wilford

85 km

 

2

to Mountain Highway Daniel Probst
Sylvie Jorger

75 km

17:57

2

to Cleveland Dam 10:54/ Mike
Michael Spagnut

50 km

7:50

2

Deep Cove to Nelson Canyon Park  
John Machray

50 km

 

2

Deep Cove to Nelson Canyon Park Linda
David Crerar

50 km

8:26

2

Deep Cove to Nelson Canyon Park Julia
Monty Watts

50 km

8:30

2

Deep Cove, Cleveland Dam return  
Randy Rankin

38 km

 

2

Deep Cove to Cypress Bowl Andrea Riddell
John Barron

38 km

7:52

2

Cypress Bowl to Deep Cove  
Ron Adams

38 km

7:52

3

Cypress Bowl to Deep Cove  
Patricia Jensen

38 km

 

1

Cypress Bowl to Deep Cove, pacing Colin  
Desmond Mott

33 km

4:05

3

Deep Cove to Cleveland Dam, to home  
Rod Hatfull

25 km

 

2

Deep Cove to Cleveland Dam, to home Cheryl
Kyla Adams

25 km

4:40

2

Deep Cove to Cleveland Dam Cathy Adams, Kari Badley, Warren Badley
Chad Hyson

 

1:00

2

Deep Cove to Old Buck  
Ean Jackson

 

1:35

2

   
15 Starters

8 finishers

       

 

2007 - Year 3

Craig Moore 4-1/2h into the Vancouver 100

For a slideshow of some early morning photos, please click here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/tags/Vancouver1002007/show/


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Run Report: Still the hardest 100 km run anywhere ...

Something worth doing is worth doing well. Anything done well is worth the effort. Greatness is gotten by passionately following your dreams …

Okay, enough with the banal quotes. This was one bugger of a tough run and the people that did all, or even part, of the 2007 Vancouver 100 did what they had to do and are most certainly stronger for the effort.

Our day started early at 4:30 am on Saturday and was quite mild and calm even for early June in Deep Cove. The past V100 starts have brought us cooler temperatures and even a bit of rain. But because all of the people have lots of experience running on the North Shore we knew that a mild morning meant hot weather to come. And we weren’t disappointed.

The course was modified once again from the start. We ran to the end of Panorama Drive and only straight back to the trailhead instead of to Gallant Drive before starting our first of many endless climbs. Tim Wiens had done a GPS of the Baden Powell Trail recently and figured this small change would give us our 100 km total just fine. Less is definitely better in this case!

One thing that never fails is that the quick runners were chatting up a storm and were ready to pounce on the trail with their excitement. That covers nearly everyone in this event. But I’m sure there were others like me that were willing to spare their energy in Karl-Jensen-fashion and get into a quiet steady pace in preparation for the enormous distance to come. By the time Gilles, Monty and I were crossing through the first Deep Cove section of trail together, the nine other runners had scurried ahead and were nowhere to be seen. Monty and Gilles kept the chatter going and I simply was amazed that I dared to start this gigantic run once again. It had been two years since I completed it the first time and I was trying not to talk too much or think too hard.

I was able to keep pace with Monty and Gilles until just past Riverside Drive but after that I was on my own. It was nice to see the crews again at Lynn Valley Headwaters: Ethelyn, Cheryl, Rod Hatfull and now Ron Adams had joined in as well to cheer us on. On the way to this point I noted some early birds on the trail. I saw 10 people walking, 3 dogs, and a biker, all before what I thought was way too early for anyone but us to be out there.

Along the way to the ¼ mark at Cleveland Dam I saw some familiar faces that I’m sure all of the runners also saw. Curb Ivanic (Ultra Fitness) was out with his small gang of runners and I recall bumping into Jenn Mar (North Shore Athletics) near Skyline at Mosquito Creek. They were happy to cheer me on but I think Curb made some tongue-in-cheek remark about the need to pick up a headlamp along the way. For some reason he thought I wouldn’t make it to the end before dark I guess. And of course we all saw Sibylle, Pat and Judy making their way on the Grouse section toward us. All the cheering was very welcome, thank you ladies.

So all was well until the mid point at Cleveland Dam. That’s when I got a severe case of an itchy back. I’ll chalk that up to the increasing heat and the intense amount of sweating I was doing (Ethelyn said I was stinky already). It couldn’t have been much past 9:00 am at this point but it was already warm and humid. My duct tape had fallen off the critical chest points and I tried to replace that with Ethelyn’s help. But I was far too sweaty for it to stick any longer so I reverted back to my old favourite Body Glide. For my itchy back I had Ethelyn rub it with a large towel. That was heaven and I was getting some strange looks from people as I moaned in ecstasy at the relief.

By this time I had found out Rob MacDonald had dropped. He was using his better judgment in preparation for a new job on Monday. Rob had some technical crew difficulties to this point and felt he was already behind the 8-ball. Having done this run twice before and also knowing his own limits for heat frustration he felt it was best to pack it in and not tempt fate. So off I went with cheers from the crowd to keep on going. Little did I know what we all were heading into from this point onward and upward.

After a normally wet and cool winter and spring, it seemed to feel awfully warm heading up the British Properties and onto the Hollyburn Chute. Fyi, here’s a little weather comparison of the three years we’ve been doing this run:

June 4, 2005
Temp: mean / max / min 14 °C / 18 °C / 10 °C
Humidity: average / max / min 64 / 82 / 36

June 3, 2006
Temp: mean / max / min 16 °C / 20 °C / 12 °C
Humidity: average / max / min 69 / 88 / 51

June 2, 2007
Temp: mean / max / min 18 °C / 25 °C / 12 °C
Humidity: average / max / min 69 / 88 / 53

It’s worth noting that there was no recorded precipitation on any of these days. However, the maximum recorded temperatures were set in 2007 for both June 2 (25 °C) and June 3 (22 °C). Can you say, “global warming”?

All the way up the Chute I was thinking I would cool down by just laying down on the snow once I got to the ski runs. But of course I cooled down enough once I was there so I didn’t need to experience the shock and awe of the ice. I did however get a much needed refill on the water at the Ranger station. That was sooo nice and cold and refreshing. Cheryl suggested later that we should encourage crews to head up there to help out their runners. It really is a long way from Cleveland Dam to the next aid at Cypress Bowl. I think this is a great plan Cheryl. I was getting hungry by this point and new it was going to still be a long haul up and over to the next check point.

Not too far from the ranger station I met up with our Knee Knacker friend Jeff Trigg who was running in the opposite direction. Jeff saw a few of the others and the way he described things was not encouraging. Jeff knows that I know that we both know what the BP can be like at the best and worst of times. And yet, with the snow on the ski runs, the sun high and bright in the sky, and the knowledge that I was heading for the hurricane zone in the trees, he was shaking his head and wishing me well. And I have to add that I asked Jeff if he had some spare food. Clearly neither of us was well enough prepared because all Jeff had was one gel along with his water. I knew we’d both be fine ultimately but I also knew we were both about to get very hungry. We headed our separate directions and motored on.

So I’m chuggin’ up the ski runs on Hollyburn, slowly but surely, sun beating down, getting a sunburn on the back of my neck but not realizing it, and who should I see but Monty running toward me out of the bushes. I had finally reached the top of the ski runs where the BP meets up and was ready to make my way down to the creek crossing. Monty was shaken and stirred and very politely said “no thanks” to my offer to guide him to the trail. After spinning his wheels for about ½ hour he just wanted to get out to the road and head for home. C’est la vie my friend! But I did take Monty’s serious advice to use my best instincts to find the trail because there were footsteps in the snow all over the place. So I did just that and also followed my own instructions to head for the sound of the creek. Thankfully I went straight for the gully and made my way across quite quickly. The little bridge was once again at the foot of about 7 feet of snow with no safe way to pass so we all had to make due.

And then there was the trail, once again. Now, how’s this for irony? In 1999 when I ran my first ultra trail run, the Knee Knacker, we had nothing but snow to run on from Black Mountain to the top of Hollyburn Chute (about 8km worth). It was truly an exceptional year and quite amazing for the first week of July. Although I’ve been trying to forget this section through the trees of Hollyburn ever since, it was the most troubling and frustrating time of running for me the whole event. Basically, with my slick road shoes and my lack of experience at the time, I was in hell. So now I found myself back in the trees, with severe snow peaks and valleys once again. The only differences being it was June, fallen trees were everywhere and the trail wasn’t marked nearly as well. Oh ya, I had better shoes too. But the best part was that I was having the most fun of the day so far. I have been through that area in both directions many times, including at night. And getting off the ski runs and into the cooler forest was now heaven! My smile came back and I new I was close to food and water and the crews. So I, like the others no doubt, picked my way around and about through the trees, risking life and limb, mostly downhill to the Cypress Bowl parking lot. Along the way the most unusual thing I saw was a dead vertical wall of snow, coming out of a creek, with what looked like foot holes dug in. I was thinking, “they can’t be serious!” Those guys climbed up this thing? It wasn’t very tall but it was horribly awkward. I chipped away at it with bare hands and then a rock but couldn’t make it work for me. So I followed the creek down to the left and made it up the snow bank the same as at least one other person that day as I could see by their tracks. And did I mention that almost every place the snow had actually fully melted there was a stream or puddle of water? Eventually I saw the buildings through the trees and then saw the gang of Ethelyn, Anne-Marie, Sebastien, Georgia and also Monty and Cheryl. They had food and water and, oh oh, a chair ;( That’s when I knew I was in trouble. I had already decided I wasn’t going to go further than ½ way but would see how I did at this check point firstly. I had been drained without enough food after that long climb and needed to feel the spring back in my step before going on. It was almost 10 hours to this point and my head was clear enough to realize what this day could become. Not wanting to wreck myself for the near future I decided to stop. It hurts but it was important for me.

Monty also stopped after planning to go half way. We had the same notion that Black Mountain was going to be no fun in the heat and snow. The others later confirmed that just the thought of coming back up Black was daunting enough let alone actually doing the climb. They had to contend with a trail that was covered in blow downs and tree limbs so much so that you could hardly find the dirt in places. Not to forget they also came very close to a mother bear and at least one cub on the lower reaches of the trail.

For the return trip, Bill Dagg joined in the fun as did Ean Jackson. Ean wanted to lead the way for David Crerar but David apparently had energy to spare still. Bill was there to help Tim but Tim eventually bagged it a Cypress Bowl. Bill went on to hook up with Glenn Pace at Cleveland Dam and they finished up together.

After heading home with Ethelyn to get cleaned up and have a bit of a rest, we went to Cleveland Dam to find Sibylle and the others. Ean and David had arrived already and David was getting “refreshed” with the help of his wife Julia and their kids. David was well in the lead at this point with a strong and steady pace.

Not too long after though, Glenn came in to fuel up and put some dry and funky toe socks on for good luck. A big swig of milk and some pizza and he was ready to go again. Bill arrived fresh and just in time to go out on the last ¼ with Glenn. Glenn didn’t think he needed the company but relented. I think he realized that having a pacer for the next 25km was probably a good thing especially at night as it was about to get dark soon. Thanks to David for ordering up Pizza and thanks to Ran Katzmann and his two girls for bringing the awesome potatoes and chicken soup for all. But I have to confess … after everyone left, Ethelyn and I covered the leftover box of pizza and potatoes with towels and a chair and went for a walk over the dam. I thought this would surely be enough to thwart the birds from attacking, but not so! Ugh. We came back to a couple of crows that had pecked a giant hole in the box and were gorging on gourmet goodies. So sorry but they were happy birds!

By way of some phone calls, we found out much later that Gilles Barbeau, Sylvia Jorger and John Machray were only leaving Cypress Bowl around 9:00 pm. So we decided to head over to Lynn Headwaters and find the others. At the Lynn Creek pipeline bridge we had just missed David but Glenn and Bill came along soon. Rhonda had joined Cheryl as a crew member at Mountain Highway and we had a short visit with them in the dark. The boys quickly headed on to the Cove of course but were looking fine. That was essentially the end of the night for us but to make the day just that much more exciting, we realized that we were locked out of home by our own mistakes. Doh. In the end it wasn’t a problem as we were able to stay at my parent’s place in West Van until I could get my landlord to let me in Sunday morning.

To round out the stories about the others, Ryan had this to say: “Wow that was a tough run, especially without my dog to sniff out the trail for me. I thought that the trail down Black Mountain seemed a lot worse than last time until I realised I had taken the Donut Trail down. Do not ever go on the Donut Trail! Unless you like rock climbing and slipping off of cliffs covered in pine needles and branches.” John decided that 76 km was enough for him with a load of chaffing to boot. Loger Aure was helped by Rod Hatfull to get up and over Black Mountain before a planned end to their day. And Ron Adams joined in with Gilles and Sylvia at Cleveland Dam to escort them through the final 7 hours or so. Both Gilles and Sylvia said how much they appreciated Ron’s chatter, jokes and pokes. It was tough enough setting a new record for being out there longer than anyone in the past but Ron made the time slip by quicker they said.

There were some firsts this time as you can see:

> First woman to finish: Sylvia Jorger
> Longest finishing times ever: Gilles and Sylvia 25:56:00
> Lowest 100km finishing rate (4/8 - 50%)
> Most blow downs on the course after many severe winter storms
> Most lost people (on Hollyburn and Black Mountain, almost everyone got lost at some point)
> Most wildlife seen on any trail run by Glenn Pacé
> The most bears seen during the event: a mother and cub(s) seen at the bottom of Black Mtn.

If you can think of some others please let me know.

By the way, Bill Dagg said, “It was by far the easiest 50 km I've ever run (should have been) and could have kept going for a lot longer. It is amazing how much of a difference that extra 50 km makes. Those times for Gilles and Sylvia are amazing. That’s persistence! They must have seen the sun come up!”


And I agree with Bill. In fact, all of the runners that finished left me in awe. I know for sure they decided that nothing was going to stop them. And I remember at one point very early on in the day when Gilles and I were giving sage advice to younger Monty about running these distances, we both agreed that the ability comes with age and only after a few brain cells have already disappeared. But I have to take that back. The more I do the runs and meet the people, the more I realize that all the runners (and crews) are interesting, intelligent and articulate people. They are out there for the love of the sport and challenge of the adventure at any age, just like me.

I heard that Glenn has done his fill of V100 runs but I’m not so sure about the others. Are there any takers for next year yet? Hmmm, well, rumours have started already about Ryan, Tim, Karl, and if the weather cooperates, me too.

Thanks for a great event and an awesome after party!

Craig

Please find results below:

Points Name Crew City/Town Event Time  
2 David Crerar Julia Lawn North Vancouver 100km 18:59:59  
2 Glenn Pacé Cheryl Johnson North Vancouver 100km 19:52:00  
2 Gilles Barbeau Lucinda Barbeau Vancouver 100km 25:56:00  
2 Sylvia Jorger Mike Heiliger North Vancouver 100km 25:56:00  
2 John Machray Linda Machray North Vancouver 76km 18:00:00  
2 Tim Wiens Maureen Wiens/Bill Dagg Vancouver 63km 12:39:00  
2 Ryan Conroy Dave Seabrook and Nick Knowlden Vancouver 52km 10:44:00  
1 Loger Aure Rod Hatfull Vancouver 52km 11:57:45  
1+1 Bill Dagg   Vancouver pacer/50km 10:30:00  
2 Monty Watts Anne-Marie, Sebastien, Georgia North Vancouver 38km 09:14:00  
2+1 Craig Moore Ethelyn David North Vancouver 38km 09:44:00  
2+1 Desmond Mott   North Vancouver 35km 04:19:00  
2 Rob MacDonald Margaret James Burnaby 26km ~04:30:00  
1 Ron Adams   North Vancouver pacer/25km 07:15:00  
2 Ean Jackson   North Vancouver pacer/25km 04:20:00  
1+1 Rod Hatfull   Vancouver pacer/13km    
2 (+1) Sibylle Tinsel   North Vancouver custom 03:10:00  
1 Pat Barry   Vancouver custom 03:10:00  
1 Judy   North Vancouver custom 03:10:00  
1 Ran Katzmann     crew    
1 Cheryl Johnson     crew    
1 Ethelyn David     crew    
1 Anne-Marie Coté     crew    
1 Sebastien Watts     crew    
1 Georgia Watts     crew    
1 Margaret James     crew    
1 Maureen Wiens     crew    
1 Julia Lawn     crew    
1 Dave Seabrook     crew    
1 Nick Knowlden     crew    
1 Mike Heiliger     crew    
1 Lucinda Barbeau     crew    
1 Linda Machray     crew    

2006 - Year 2

The trail chewed them up and spit them out....Rob MacDonald at the finish

Photo: Rob MacDonald having a well deserved rest at the finish of the Vancouver 100

It was cruel and unrelenting.  “This is the hardest run I’ve ever done”, repeated several runners including one of the most experienced and the fastest runner this year, Rod Hatfull.  “Thanks very much but you’re an evil Race Director”, to paraphrase Geoff Palmer.  “This is the hardest 100 km run anywhere” according to Glenn Pacé.
 
I get the feeling runners weren’t necessarily happy with me this year but they certainly felt they had accomplished a great task whether or not they completed the full event.  Full of newbies and veterans alike, the 2006 Vancouver 100 is shaping up to be in a class of its own quite simply because of the unexpected nature of the snow in the hills and the persistently technical course that runs across five giant mountains on the North Shore of Vancouver.  And there was no shortage of excitement to fill in the gaps between gasps.
 
The day started with runners awakening to rain with their alarms around 3:00 am.  They were already unhappy campers hearing that wet sound outside but definitely past the point of no return with many being committed to the event for several months prior.  By 4:30 am we were all gathered at the start line in Deep Cove with the crews ready for what lay ahead.  I reiterated that the start would include a 2.7 km warm up on Panorama Drive to stretch the distance to 100 km and clarified the route directions for Cypress Provincial Park including Hollyburn Mountain and Black Mountain.  By the way, ya gotta like a race briefing that can skip over about 35 km of trail because the participants already know the route very well or will stick with someone that knows the route well.
 
So at about 4:34 am the runners started down the road.  I and the crews were so excited for them after all the anticipation that it seemed like forever until they made it back to the starting point (after 2 km) only to turnaround again and head for the Baden Powell trailhead.  But they did and they were already damp when we saw them with the rain drizzling down.  Thankfully the rain didn’t last long and it was only a matter of a few hours before the sun was starting to peak through the clouds.
 
Since the first part of the trail is straightforward to Hollyburn, it was a matter of going through the turns and getting settled into a good pace.  There was no clear leader and the front 8 were closely bunched.  Rod made it to the halfway point first with Bill, Dan and Tim in hot pursuit.  Everyone was running well and the custom runners had mostly finished their day by this time.  All except for Baldwin who was just getting going at Cleveland Dam, ready to chase the back of the pack.  Baldwin was close behind them going up Hollyburn Mountain and managed to make it all the way to the top of the Hollyburn ski runs before turning around. He was also well coordinated with matching wild blue shirt and gators.  At the top, Baldwin decided not to go past the turning point as It did not look pleasant.  The 100 km runners confirmed he was right.  That section has endless slippery roots and gnarly footsteps with all the rain, wear, and tear in recent years.
 
After sending all of them off at Cleveland Dam, I did some grocery shopping for the return trip burgerfest and delivered the goods to Ethelyn who kindly offered to cook it up.  Actually, before going to the Dam, I drove custom runner Chris Benn back to Deep Cove from Lynn Headwaters since he was done early due to groin pain.  Chris was supposed to be meeting up with Desmond later at Cleveland Dam.  But just to show the spirit of our runners, Chris offered to walk back to Deep Cove from Lynn Valley, with a smile.  Like, right. Chris, are you sure you didn’t mean to do the full 100?  Also, Berglind went on to do her out and back to St. Georges from the Cove and by this time, Sibylle, Michele, Pat, Faith and Claudia had started at Grouse to manage a mid trail meet up with the runners coming their way.  There was no end of opportunity for club members to join in the fun for this daylong event.
 
So while the big guns were hauling ass up the Hollyburn Chute, Ethelyn kindly cooked up burgers and macaroni to be served at Cleveland Dam for our picnic.  And eventually I headed out in a hurry to beat them to the ½ way point at Nelson Canyon Park just East of Horseshoe Bay.  Part of my rush came from a frantic short phone call from Lucy Barbeau (Gilles’ crew) about Linda Machray’s car being on fire up at Cypress Bowl.  A bystander called the police and fire and there was lots of excitement.  They drove all the way up that long road to help mom Linda with her three kids in need.  Thankfully it turned out to not be a fire but a loose hose that caused a lot of steam.  One tow truck later and a round-about ride from Ron Adams and all was taken care of.  Ron stopped at Cypress because he has Western States 100 in a couple of weeks and didn’t want to push it.  Ron and Gilles are both heading down to California for the big one on June 24.  They’ll have some good stories to share from this one.
 
Back in Nelson Canyon Park at the ½ way point, I almost made it up the new section of trail and out to the BP to do a little bit of marking before seeing the first runner come down off Black Mountain.  Rod got to me firstly, then Bill, Dan and Tim.  It felt like they were in a hurry somehow.  Was there pizza waiting for them like last year?  Like, no.  It was just that mid race focus and the end of the free-fall trip down short little Black.
 
But I did make it out to the sharp corner and hung some flagging tape for the unaware still to come.  That was also my first trip up this part of the trail.  It actually follows the Trans Canada Trail for a while and then veers off through old growth lush forest green from new ferns and thick moss.  I had a great time seeing the others come down and then have all the runners (except John and Gilles) pass me again for the trip back to Deep Cove.  Nobody was in a hurry to do the 3500’ climb to the top but they sure were focused.  I ran with Glenn and Mike for a few meters and clearly they were in the middle of a 100 km run. They were focused, determined, and ignoring the pain the best they could.  And Mike was glad his 11 pound pack was getting lighter.
 
When I got back out to the parking area at the halfway point, Lucy and Gilles’ friend Steve were patiently waiting for Gilles and John.  Lucy was knitting and Steve was preparing to join Gilles for the return trip. Earlier, I saw Cheryl and some of the other crew people biding their time.  It takes special people to hang out for a very full and long day to help their loved ones and good friends.  And we had the best crews being patient and helpful to see their runners through as far and fast as they could go.
 
I knew the runners had their work cut out for them at this point.  Having done this run before myself, the climb back up Black Mountain is the hardest section of ‘running’ around these parts.  It was the only time I remember hallucinating last year during this event and it is an incredible physical challenge after running 50 km over more than 8 hours.  And to top it off, the snow above would be softer and even more difficult in the afternoon to slug through than on the first time through.  Tim packed it in at Cypress after giving it his best shot.  A general uneasiness had overcome him along with wandering runner syndrome.  Those darn snow-covered trails were not easy to follow.
 
When I got to Cleveland Dam around 4:30 pm with Ethelyn, Ean and Sibylle were already settled in with their kids and a couple of others; I remember Rick Arikado and Desmond Mott in particular were there.  And Baldwin hung around after his run with the hot soup he had prepared.  The sun was shining and the day was glorious.  The Lions were in plain view with lots of snow still and the mostly clear blue sky and warm temperature was perfect.  I was preparing to run out with the last person and either go home in Lynn Valley or on to Deep Cove.
 
As the runners came in, they told us with their words and expressions that the third quarter was just plain hard and tiring.  They were punching through the snow on Black and slipping on the roots on Hollyburn.  Each one of them arrived with a persistent but slow pace and sat down for a major break.  Clothes were changed including Glenn’s funky toe socks.  And the extra food we prepared was appreciated but not eaten by everyone since stomachs were sensitive and at this point people didn’t want to take much of a chance.  Rod was going strong but shaking his head about the last 24 km.  Bill and Dan came next and were equally drained.  Bill sat down on the grass eventually for a break.  Dan headed over to the parking lot to see his faithful crew of mom and brother.  I got a chance to see Dan’s support box and it looked very good. I think that he was well prepared and that helped him to keep up with fast moving Bill.  Elke joined these two for the last quarter and learned what being a good pacer is all about. 
 
Rob MacDonald was having a tough time at the ¾ mark and he seemed to be not sweating enough.  But after some food and a couple of rough moments, his wife and crew, Margaret, helped him on his way. Glenn was greeted by his crew, Cheryl, and his wife, Manon, and their kids, and I think that felt like a breath of fresh air for him (not them though, whew).  I think Geoff came in at the same time and headed over to the parking lot to meet his crew of girlfriend Lisa.  Glenn and Geoff stuck together the remaining distance. 
 
Eventually Mike wandered in and also recounted his struggle on this quarter.  I learned afterward that Mike was ready to stop but I guess he saw me ready to go so he decided to keep moving after a burger and a sit down.  I decided to join Mike rather than wait for Gilles and Steve.  We had gotten a call from Lucy around the time Mike came in and the last two boys were just at Cypress Bowl.  They were doing well but it was going to be a couple more hours before they would make it to Cleveland Dam at which point they decided to call it quits anyway.  So I finally got a chance to hit the trail for some badly needed exercise.  Mike set the pace of course.  He didn’t promise to be chatty but I think a bit of conversation helped to keep him going and then to make the clear decision to finally stop at Mountain Highway.  We were able to call fiancée Melissa on the cell phone and get her and her girls to pick us up around 9:30 pm.  Mike was very satisfied with his 85km run and feels he’s lived to tell another tale in good health.
 
While Mike and I were on the trail I got a call from Rod Hatfull (15:52).  He had finished with an amazingly fast time for the second half.  I believe it is officially a negative split since it took him a full 8 hours to get half way and then less than 8 hours to go back.  And Rod said he felt great and was very strong coming into the Cove.  He sounded good and was also very happy to be done.  I’m sorry we couldn’t have been there to provide a better welcome but it was nice talking on the phone at least.  Considering the snow conditions I think he would have come close to matching Randy’s time from last year.  Rod made it home and was in bed asleep by 10:15 pm by the way.  What a fantastic run Rod, congratulations.
 
Melissa gave me a short ride down the hill to my home and I posted Rod’s time.  I finally did head out to Deep Cove around 10:30 pm to see most of the remaining runners come in.  When I got to the finish line, Bill and Dan were done.  Bill was sitting again but on hard pavement this time.  Dan was already long gone.  And by the way, Dan told me he left his identification with his mom so he didn’t have it when crossing the border back into Washington State.  The border guards then made him get out of the car and go tell his story to someone that cared.  It seems they weren’t fooled by the drawn look and beat up emotions.  He tried to explain what he was doing but they likely didn’t believe it anyway.  But Dan got through and admitted to me later that this was the hardest thing he’s ever done in his life (the run that is).  Don’t worry Dan. You’re young.  You’ll have lots of chances still to top this one.  Maybe next year on the same course?
 
When Rob MacDonald arrived (18:28) all he wanted to do was lie down.  So he did right in the middle of the parking lot.  His wife Margaret was there to bring him a pillow and blanket.  Rob was thrilled to be finished and even knocked off significant time from last year.  Rob is now only the second person to complete this wicked run twice (2005 and 2006), along with Randy Hunter (2000 and 2005).
 
I also saw Glenn and Geoff (18:59) happily saunter up to the darkened parking area with their headlamps beaming and where we sent them off a minute short of 19 hours earlier.  It was great to have both of them complete the run since Geoff had wanted to do it last year but couldn’t due to a cross-training injury.  And Glenn seemed to need this notch on his belt badly.  It’s a fine day when you can say you’ve crossed the North Shore Mountains twice.
 
It was now midnight and the day was done.  I headed back home and the only person remaining on the course was John Machray, determined as ever to do something great.  Ron Adams had been helping him from Cypress Bowl since his wife Linda’s wheels had given up.  John took a big break in the middle to avoid the big climb up Black with wise intentions.  And although he had no one to talk to anymore that didn’t stop him from yearning for the Cove.  He arrived at 12:40 am in good spirits as always.
 
After a night of mostly good sleep, we had the post-event potluck party at my place.  Dan didn’t chance another crossing of the border and rockin’ Rod stayed home to do house renovations.  But many others came to share their stories and war wounds, especially Gilles.  We all agreed that Gilles’ leg chaffing is the worst we’ve ever seen.  Man, that’s gotta hurt. Please take good care of it Gilles. 
 
Ya know, one thing I didn’t do at my post-event presentation was give out awards. So how is this:
 
Rod Hatfull
Most steady runner with strange eating habits

Bill Dagg

Most determined to finish without looking over his shoulder too many times.

Dan Probst

Dug deepest and came up strong

Rob MacDonald
Felt crappiest but couldn't stop running

Glenn Pace

Most thankful for an awesome run

Geoff Palmer
Second time lucky, yearns for new RD
 
Michael Wardas
Most satisfied self-supported runner
           
Gilles Barbeau
Best large round leg wounds

Tim Wiens
Most challenged with great potential  
     
Ron Adams
Most determined to have a shower but couldn’t   
      
John Machray
Best attitude, most talkative as always  
    
For me, this is the first time I’ve been on the other side of a big run.  Watching these guys put themselves on the line of pain and suffering for the simple act of being able to say they did it is amazing.  I also got to see the dedicated friends and close family members show their love.  Their support was beautifully unconditional and it was ultra-clear this event was something the runners had to do for themselves.  Thanks to everyone for making it a great day.
 
Craig Moore

Some Photos are posted here (more to come)

100km
Rod Hatfull     15:52:00        - 2 points
Bill Dagg      17:48:00           - 2 points
Dan Probst  17:48:00           - 2 points
Rob MacDonald  18:28:00      - 2 points
Glenn Pace     18:59:00         - 2 points
Geoff Palmer   18:59:00        - 2 points

Custom:
John Machray     87 km - drove from 1/2 way back to Cypress Bowl then ran back to Deep Cove      - 2 points
Michael Wardas   85 km to Mtn Hwy  17:10      - 2 points
Gilles Barbeau     76 km to Cleveland Dam        - 2 points
Tim Wiens   67 km   stopped at Cypress Bowl   - 2 points
Ron Adams  42 km  stopped at Cypress Bowl   - 2 points
Steven Lee   24 km Horseshoe Bay to Cleveland Dam with Gilles      - 2 points
Elke Bauer 25km Cleveland Dam to Deep Cove with Bill and Dan    - 1 point
Desmond Mott   Deep Cove to Cleveland Dam then home             - 2 points
Chris Benn  12.5 km  stopped at Lynn Headwaters Pipeline Bridge   - 2 points
Berglind Hafsteinsdottir   40km St. Georges return to Deep Cove 6:01:48 - 2 points
Baldwin Lee   Cleveland Dam to top of Hollyburn ski runs return        - 3 points
Pat Barry    Grouse to Mosquito Creek return 2:30                           - 2 points
Michele Sherstan     Grouse to Mosquito Creek return 2:30                 - 2 points
Claudia Bullington    Grouse to Mosquito Creek return 2:30                - 2 points
Sibylle Tinsel
    Grouse to Mckay Creek return 1:25                          - 3 points
Faith Wells
    Grouse to Mckay Creek return 1:25                            - 2 points
Craig Moore
   1:45 Cleveland Dam to Mtn Hwy with Mike Wardas      - 3 points

2006 Vancouver 100Crew
Maureen Wiens
- 3 points
Cheryl Johnson
- 3 points
Manon Pace
- 3 points
Lucinda Barbeau
- 3 points
Dan's Mom
- 3 points
Margaret MacDonald - 3 points
Linda Machray - 3 point
Cathy Adams - 1 point
Dan's brother
- 1 point
Baldwin Lee
-  see above
Sibylle Tinsel
- see above
Ethelyn David -  burger/macaroni cooker! 1 point
Ean Jackson - 1 point

Photo: A peaceful view from Cleveland Dam (km 76) west towards the Lions, just before the last participants, Gilles Barbeau and Steven Lee, arrived at the aidstation. Looks can be deceiving...there was snow in those mountains!

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The 2006 Vancouver 100 Run Report

It was cruel and unrelenting.  “This is the hardest run I’ve ever done”, repeated several runners including one of the most experienced and the fastest runner this year, Rod Hatfull.  “Thanks very much but you’re an evil Race Director”, to paraphrase Geoff Palmer.  “This is the hardest 100 km run anywhere” according to Glenn Pacé.
 
I get the feeling runners weren’t necessarily happy with me this year but they certainly felt they had accomplished a great task whether or not they completed the full event.  Full of newbies and veterans alike, the 2006 Vancouver 100 is shaping up to be in a class of its own quite simply because of the unexpected nature of the snow in the hills and the persistently technical course that runs across five giant mountains on the North Shore of Vancouver.  And there was no shortage of excitement to fill in the gaps between gasps.
 
The day started with runners awakening to rain with their alarms around 3:00 am.  They were already unhappy campers hearing that wet sound outside but definitely past the point of no return with many being committed to the event for several months prior.  By 4:30 am we were all gathered at the start line in Deep Cove with the crews ready for what lay ahead.  I reiterated that the start would include a 2.7 km warm up on Panorama Drive to stretch the distance to 100 km and clarified the route directions for Cypress Provincial Park including Hollyburn Mountain and Black Mountain.  By the way, ya gotta like a race briefing that can skip over about 35 km of trail because the participants already know the route very well or will stick with someone that knows the route well.
 
So at about 4:34 am the runners started down the road.  I and the crews were so excited for them after all the anticipation that it seemed like forever until they made it back to the starting point (after 2 km) only to turnaround again and head for the Baden Powell trailhead.  But they did and they were already damp when we saw them with the rain drizzling down.  Thankfully the rain didn’t last long and it was only a matter of a few hours before the sun was starting to peak through the clouds.
 
Since the first part of the trail is straightforward to Hollyburn, it was a matter of going through the turns and getting settled into a good pace.  There was no clear leader and the front 8 were closely bunched.  Rod made it to the halfway point first with Bill, Dan and Tim in hot pursuit.  Everyone was running well and the custom runners had mostly finished their day by this time.  All except for Baldwin who was just getting going at Cleveland Dam, ready to chase the back of the pack.  Baldwin was close behind them going up Hollyburn Mountain and managed to make it all the way to the top of the Hollyburn ski runs before turning around. He was also well coordinated with matching wild blue shirt and gators.  At the top, Baldwin decided not to go past the turning point as It did not look pleasant.  The 100 km runners confirmed he was right.  That section has endless slippery roots and gnarly footsteps with all the rain, wear, and tear in recent years.
 
After sending all of them off at Cleveland Dam, I did some grocery shopping for the return trip burgerfest and delivered the goods to Ethelyn who kindly offered to cook it up.  Actually, before going to the Dam, I drove custom runner Chris Benn back to Deep Cove from Lynn Headwaters since he was done early due to groin pain.  Chris was supposed to be meeting up with Desmond later at Cleveland Dam.  But just to show the spirit of our runners, Chris offered to walk back to Deep Cove from Lynn Valley, with a smile.  Like, right. Chris, are you sure you didn’t mean to do the full 100?  Also, Berglind went on to do her out and back to St. Georges from the Cove and by this time, Sibylle, Michele, Pat, Faith and Claudia had started at Grouse to manage a mid trail meet up with the runners coming their way.  There was no end of opportunity for club members to join in the fun for this daylong event.
 
So while the big guns were hauling ass up the Hollyburn Chute, Ethelyn kindly cooked up burgers and macaroni to be served at Cleveland Dam for our picnic.  And eventually I headed out in a hurry to beat them to the ½ way point at Nelson Canyon Park just East of Horseshoe Bay.  Part of my rush came from a frantic short phone call from Lucy Barbeau (Gilles’ crew) about Linda Machray’s car being on fire up at Cypress Bowl.  A bystander called the police and fire and there was lots of excitement.  They drove all the way up that long road to help mom Linda with her three kids in need.  Thankfully it turned out to not be a fire but a loose hose that caused a lot of steam.  One tow truck later and a round-about ride from Ron Adams and all was taken care of.  Ron stopped at Cypress because he has Western States 100 in a couple of weeks and didn’t want to push it.  Ron and Gilles are both heading down to California for the big one on June 24.  They’ll have some good stories to share from this one.
 
Back in Nelson Canyon Park at the ½ way point, I almost made it up the new section of trail and out to the BP to do a little bit of marking before seeing the first runner come down off Black Mountain.  Rod got to me firstly, then Bill, Dan and Tim.  It felt like they were in a hurry somehow.  Was there pizza waiting for them like last year?  Like, no.  It was just that mid race focus and the end of the free-fall trip down short little Black.
 
But I did make it out to the sharp corner and hung some flagging tape for the unaware still to come.  That was also my first trip up this part of the trail.  It actually follows the Trans Canada Trail for a while and then veers off through old growth lush forest green from new ferns and thick moss.  I had a great time seeing the others come down and then have all the runners (except John and Gilles) pass me again for the trip back to Deep Cove.  Nobody was in a hurry to do the 3500’ climb to the top but they sure were focused.  I ran with Glenn and Mike for a few meters and clearly they were in the middle of a 100 km run. They were focused, determined, and ignoring the pain the best they could.  And Mike was glad his 11 pound pack was getting lighter.
 
When I got back out to the parking area at the halfway point, Lucy and Gilles’ friend Steve were patiently waiting for Gilles and John.  Lucy was knitting and Steve was preparing to join Gilles for the return trip. Earlier, I saw Cheryl and some of the other crew people biding their time.  It takes special people to hang out for a very full and long day to help their loved ones and good friends.  And we had the best crews being patient and helpful to see their runners through as far and fast as they could go.
 
I knew the runners had their work cut out for them at this point.  Having done this run before myself, the climb back up Black Mountain is the hardest section of ‘running’ around these parts.  It was the only time I remember hallucinating last year during this event and it is an incredible physical challenge after running 50 km over more than 8 hours.  And to top it off, the snow above would be softer and even more difficult in the afternoon to slug through than on the first time through.  Tim packed it in at Cypress after giving it his best shot.  A general uneasiness had overcome him along with wandering runner syndrome.  Those darn snow-covered trails were not easy to follow.
 
When I got to Cleveland Dam around 4:30 pm with Ethelyn, Ean and Sibylle were already settled in with their kids and a couple of others; I remember Rick Arikado and Desmond Mott in particular were there.  And Baldwin hung around after his run with the hot soup he had prepared.  The sun was shining and the day was glorious.  The Lions were in plain view with lots of snow still and the mostly clear blue sky and warm temperature was perfect.  I was preparing to run out with the last person and either go home in Lynn Valley or on to Deep Cove.
 
As the runners came in, they told us with their words and expressions that the third quarter was just plain hard and tiring.  They were punching through the snow on Black and slipping on the roots on Hollyburn.  Each one of them arrived with a persistent but slow pace and sat down for a major break.  Clothes were changed including Glenn’s funky toe socks.  And the extra food we prepared was appreciated but not eaten by everyone since stomachs were sensitive and at this point people didn’t want to take much of a chance.  Rod was going strong but shaking his head about the last 24 km.  Bill and Dan came next and were equally drained.  Bill sat down on the grass eventually for a break.  Dan headed over to the parking lot to see his faithful crew of mom and brother.  I got a chance to see Dan’s support box and it looked very good. I think that he was well prepared and that helped him to keep up with fast moving Bill.  Elke joined these two for the last quarter and learned what being a good pacer is all about. 
 
Rob MacDonald was having a tough time at the ¾ mark and he seemed to be not sweating enough.  But after some food and a couple of rough moments, his wife and crew, Margaret, helped him on his way. Glenn was greeted by his crew, Cheryl, and his wife, Manon, and their kids, and I think that felt like a breath of fresh air for him (not them though, whew).  I think Geoff came in at the same time and headed over to the parking lot to meet his crew of girlfriend Lisa.  Glenn and Geoff stuck together the remaining distance. 
 
Eventually Mike wandered in and also recounted his struggle on this quarter.  I learned afterward that Mike was ready to stop but I guess he saw me ready to go so he decided to keep moving after a burger and a sit down.  I decided to join Mike rather than wait for Gilles and Steve.  We had gotten a call from Lucy around the time Mike came in and the last two boys were just at Cypress Bowl.  They were doing well but it was going to be a couple more hours before they would make it to Cleveland Dam at which point they decided to call it quits anyway.  So I finally got a chance to hit the trail for some badly needed exercise.  Mike set the pace of course.  He didn’t promise to be chatty but I think a bit of conversation helped to keep him going and then to make the clear decision to finally stop at Mountain Highway.  We were able to call fiancée Melissa on the cell phone and get her and her girls to pick us up around 9:30 pm.  Mike was very satisfied with his 85km run and feels he’s lived to tell another tale in good health.
 
While Mike and I were on the trail I got a call from Rod Hatfull (15:52).  He had finished with an amazingly fast time for the second half.  I believe it is officially a negative split since it took him a full 8 hours to get half way and then less than 8 hours to go back.  And Rod said he felt great and was very strong coming into the Cove.  He sounded good and was also very happy to be done.  I’m sorry we couldn’t have been there to provide a better welcome but it was nice talking on the phone at least.  Considering the snow conditions I think he would have come close to matching Randy’s time from last year.  Rod made it home and was in bed asleep by 10:15 pm by the way.  What a fantastic run Rod, congratulations.
 
Melissa gave me a short ride down the hill to my home and I posted Rod’s time.  I finally did head out to Deep Cove around 10:30 pm to see most of the remaining runners come in.  When I got to the finish line, Bill and Dan were done.  Bill was sitting again but on hard pavement this time.  Dan was already long gone.  And by the way, Dan told me he left his identification with his mom so he didn’t have it when crossing the border back into Washington State.  The border guards then made him get out of the car and go tell his story to someone that cared.  It seems they weren’t fooled by the drawn look and beat up emotions.  He tried to explain what he was doing but they likely didn’t believe it anyway.  But Dan got through and admitted to me later that this was the hardest thing he’s ever done in his life (the run that is).  Don’t worry Dan. You’re young.  You’ll have lots of chances still to top this one.  Maybe next year on the same course?
 
When Rob MacDonald arrived (18:28) all he wanted to do was lie down.  So he did right in the middle of the parking lot.  His wife Margaret was there to bring him a pillow and blanket.  Rob was thrilled to be finished and even knocked off significant time from last year.  Rob is now only the second person to complete this wicked run twice (2005 and 2006), along with Randy Hunter (2000 and 2005).
 
I also saw Glenn and Geoff (18:59) happily saunter up to the darkened parking area with their headlamps beaming and where we sent them off a minute short of 19 hours earlier.  It was great to have both of them complete the run since Geoff had wanted to do it last year but couldn’t due to a cross-training injury.  And Glenn seemed to need this notch on his belt badly.  It’s a fine day when you can say you’ve crossed the North Shore Mountains twice.
 
It was now midnight and the day was done.  I headed back home and the only person remaining on the course was John Machray, determined as ever to do something great.  Ron Adams had been helping him from Cypress Bowl since his wife Linda’s wheels had given up.  John took a big break in the middle to avoid the big climb up Black with wise intentions.  And although he had no one to talk to anymore that didn’t stop him from yearning for the Cove.  He arrived at 12:40 am in good spirits as always.
 
After a night of mostly good sleep, we had the post-event potluck party at my place.  Dan didn’t chance another crossing of the border and rockin’ Rod stayed home to do house renovations.  But many others came to share their stories and war wounds, especially Gilles.  We all agreed that Gilles’ leg chaffing is the worst we’ve ever seen.  Man, that’s gotta hurt. Please take good care of it Gilles. 
 
Ya know, one thing I didn’t do at my post-event presentation was give out awards. So how is this:
 
Rod Hatfull
Most steady runner with strange eating habits

Bill Dagg

Most determined to finish without looking over his shoulder too many times.

Dan Probst

Dug deepest and came up strong

Rob MacDonald
Felt crappiest but couldn't stop running

Glenn Pace

Most thankful for an awesome run

Geoff Palmer
Second time lucky, yearns for new RD
 
Michael Wardas
Most satisfied self-supported runner
           
Gilles Barbeau
Best large round leg wounds

Tim Wiens
Most challenged with great potential  
     
Ron Adams
Most determined to have a shower but couldn’t   
      
John Machray
Best attitude, most talkative as always  
    
For me, this is the first time I’ve been on the other side of a big run.  Watching these guys put themselves on the line of pain and suffering for the simple act of being able to say they did it is amazing.  I also got to see the dedicated friends and close family members show their love.  Their support was beautifully unconditional and it was ultra-clear this event was something the runners had to do for themselves.  Thanks to everyone for making it a great day.
 
Craig Moore

2005 - Year 1

"I've done lots of 100 milers and for some reason this course really tears you up ... it's harder than most 100 milers." Randy Hunter (echoed by Rob MacDonald)

Saturday June 4 and Sunday June 5, 2005

The Double Custom Runners
Randy "You Can't Hunt Down The Hunter" Hunter
14:48:00 (6:37 first half, 20 minute pit stop)
Rob "I laughed, I cried, I puked" MacDonald
18:45:00 (8:10 first half, 8 minute pit stop)
Karl "I love the night" Jensen
22:51:37 (9:22 first half, 24 minute pit stop)
John "Hallucinating can be so much fun" Machray
22:51:37 (9:22 first half, 24 minute pit stop)
Ron "My son was even more excited than me to do The Double" Adams
22:51:37 (9:23 first half, 21 minute pit stop)
Gilles "This pace is just right" Barbeau
22:51:37 (9:22 first half, 22 minute pit stop)
Craig "Black Mountain makes everything else look easy" Moore
22:51:37 (9:22 first half, 22 minute pit stop)

The Double Section Finishers

Brad Misak (to Lynn Headwaters return with dog Pepper, 27.2 Km)
5:30:30
Doug Mackay (Cleveland Dam to Cypress return)
5:25:00
Baldwin Lee (Cleveland Dam 24.40 Km)
4:32:00
Peter Zubcsek (Lynn Canyon 12.25 Km)
2:01:10
Gyula Szabo (Lynn Canyon 12.25 Km)
2:01:10
Ean Jackson (Cleveland Dam to Brother's Creek return)
0:60:00
Troy Angrignon (to Indian River Road with friend Charles, 5.2 Km)
0:55:00
( **** scroll down to see the pictures *** )

Craig's run report

I made an attempt to put a full run report together but I had just too many thoughts and descriptions to have it make any sense and still be readable in one sitting. So I just thought I'd say what an awesome time we all had on this epic run. It was a bunch of great people coming together with a common goal. The runners, the crew, and the spectators were all happy, amazed and stunned that we could actually do this event.
This is easily the toughest run around these parts, even at a mere 96 km. The people that ran the full distance are well experienced and besides having a ton of fun doing this type of event we also take it seriously enough to understand the challenge and were very well prepared. We all knew the route and were ready for anything that came our way, including the bear, the cool weather at the higher elevations and through the night, the light, the dark, the incredible support we had with too much great food to choose from, and those burgers and soup at the 3/4 mark, mmmmm. We took it all in stride and as you can see in the pictures below, the five of us that came in together at the very end all had smiles for a run well done.
It was great to have a few other people come and run with us for a while as they added to the nature of the event and helped to keep us safe. Ean Jackson on the other hand also surprised us with his dignified greeting in the middle of the night at Mountain Highway, showing his true respect for an event that I'm happy to say he is green with envy over but also very proud of us about.
So instead of a long report by me, I've added Ron Adams thorough and thoughtful words here for you to read over and enjoy. I hope we have all inspired you to greater challenges and I also hope that people stop calling me crazy soon because it really was one of the easiest and most satisfying runs I've ever done.
happy trails,
Craig Moore, The Double 2005 Race Director

The Double - 60 miles
North and West Vancouver BC
June 4th and 5th, 2005

Background
The Baden Powell Trail on Vancouver’s North Shore Mountains runs the full length of Vancouver’s North Shore from Horseshoe Bay to Deep Cove. It is 30 Horton miles (16,000 feet elevation change) of arguably some of the most technical and difficult running terrain in North America. This trail is the home of the Knee Knackering North Shore Trail Run an epic event held on the 2nd Saturday of July each year. The Double (60 miles, 32000 ft elevation change) is an out and back starting at Deep Cove running to Horseshoe Bay and then returning to Deep Cove. The Double has only been accomplished once before by 2 runners (Mike Wardas and Randy Hunter). It was also previously attempted by current year RD Craig Moore who had unfinished business on the trail (in his own words he previously “bonked big time”) This event was structured as a pay back to prove that ... yes, it can be done !!

Executive Summary
7 starters, 7 finishers (plus a number of folk who ran part way)
The race was won by former finisher Randy Hunter of North Vancouver in 14:48. 2nd Place went to Rob MacDonald of Burnaby in 18:45. Yours truly was in a 5 way tie for 3rd place in 22:51:37. Ahem ... if you do the math you will quickly figure out that was also a 5 way tie for last place =:-0 You will also figure out that almost 23 hours for 60 miles says a lot about the course difficulty. I’ve described it here as a race, but it was really more of an adventure.

Highlights
Just 20 minutes into the run at Deep Cove Lookout, with the entire field of runners still together, we ran into a black bear guarding a junction in the trail. This Winnie the Pooh was obviously used to people (we have a lot ... I mean a lot ... of bear incidents in the built up part of this community) and he was not willing to give up one inch of the trail. RD Craig Moore made a snap judgement and we took a different trail which circled around and met up with the normal course. I’ve gotta say that a bear encounter with a whole lot of runners is a lot more comfortable than meeting a bear when you’re all by yourself ... I’ve now done both.
The course was in great shape. Virtually all of the snow in the high country was gone. This meant that there was lots of mud in the alpine sections. After tip toeing around the first few mud sections, everyone just gave in and ran through the muck. Some muddy sections looked terrible but were actually quite firm. Other sections looked firm and then tried to suck your shoe off. You never know !!.
Running down Black Mountain was an experience. The regular Knee Knacker Race goes up this climb. It is very steep and there are many, many sections where you need to look for hand holds in the rock to pull yourself up. Of course going up, you are leaning into the mountain. Going down, on the other hand, you tend to lean out. It was very tricky but we all survived to run again.
The aid stations and volunteers were fabulous. We also had the good fortune to have the same aid stations and volunteers at each location where the trail crossed a road or came close to a road. With such a small field, the aid stations were run off a tailgate with the same volunteers moving along the course. They were great, anticipating the runner’s every want and need.
God’s aid stations - the earliest berries are Salmon berries and they were right in season with many nice plump berries lining much of the course. I even found an early bearing mountain blueberry bush and lucked out in discovering an early wild strawberry at Eagle Bluff (elevation 3500 ft)
Surprise aid stations - Former finisher Mike Wardas showed up at Capilano Lake (Cleveland Dam) with his BBQ and a pot of steaming hot chicken noodle soup. Most of us showed up at this point right at sundown and the burgers and soup really hit the spot. BTW - Did I mention how good a gooey cheese pizza is after 10 hours and at halfway ?? It really hit the spot and both the pizza and the burgers later were just what the doctor ordered to help keep the tummy happy and the legs moving :-)
Much is often said about the camaraderie in ultrarunning. This was particularly the case in this run. We started out as a bunch of friendly strangers at the start, buddies as the run went on, but after dark we became a group of friends united in the common purpose of achieving our quest. Each of us now share a common bond of almost 23 hours together on the trail that we will treasure for a lifetime.
I learned that there can be a big difference between a trail that is runnable in the daytime and a trail that is runnable at night. Much of this trail is so technical that it cannot be run, particularly at night. Staying together and not losing the trail (even a trail that we know so well in daylight) was a major accomplishment.
A big practical issue was the effect of fatigue after 20 hours or so, where runners normally as sure footed as mountain goats now had to really focus in order not to trip over all of the gnarly roots and rocks.
Ultrarunner extraordinare Ean “Action” Jackson (currently out of action due to injury) was out to greet the group at 2 am at Mountain Highway. As befitting the occasion, he was dressed in a business suit and tie. His excuse was that he had been at a wedding reception ... and we thought he was dressed up to greet a bunch of smelly ultrarunners on the brink of a historic achievement :-)
Another highlight was the privilege (and privilege is the word) of running the whole way with Grand Slammer Karl Jensen who has just so much knowledge of running for 24 hours or more. Karl will be running the Bighorn 100 miler in 2 weeks. He told me that he was inspired to do that race by DC’s photos of last year’s event. Early on, Karl kept telling us that he really enjoyed running at night, but with 5 miles to go we were within a few minutes of his home and he was tempted to head home to bed at 3 am. It didn’t happen. He stuck it out with all of the rest of us. He had to. His car was in Deep Cove :-)
I had hoped that we would finish at night, but just in the last mile, the light steadily increased and we finished at 5 am in daylight, running into the finish line 5 abreast with RD Craig Moore in the centre of the group, thus accomplishing his own quest of “Completing the Double” Congratulations to Craig and thank-you to Craig for the privilege of accompanying him in his quest.

Ron Adams
North Vancouver, British Columbia

Runners do The Double (North Shore News June 19, 2005)

Deana Lancaster

[email protected]

A small group of experienced runners conquered the almost unthinkable this month.

Seven members of Club Fat Ass - which promotes oddball endurance sport events - raced the 48-kilometre course, along the Baden-Powell Trail, from Deep Cove to Eagle Ridge. It's the same route as the North Shore's infamously gruelling Knee Knackering trail race.

But once they finished it, this crew turned around and ran back again.

"What else are you going to do for fun on a weekend?" said organizer and North Vancouver resident Craig Moore.

The Double, as the event was called, began at 6 a.m. on Saturday June 4. According to Moore, the distance had only been completed twice before, once by ultra-athlete Randy Hunter. On this, his second time running it, Hunter finished first, at a time of 14 hours and 48 minutes.

Second-place finisher Rob MacDonald completed the race in 18 hours and 45 minutes, while the remaining five: Moore, Karl Jensen, John Machray, Ron Adams and Gilles Barbeau ran together and finished it in 22 hours and 51 minutes - completing it just before 5 a.m. on June 5.

"We got back into the parking lot at Deep Cove just as the sun was shining enough for us to turn off our lights," said Moore.

It's a feat that should only be attempted by extremely experienced, prepared and well-supported athletes, cautions Moore.

"It can be really intense," he said. Running 100-kilometre distances requires careful pacing.

"You have to pay attention. And we're all experienced, we know when we get tired we have to pick up our feet. If you lose concentration you'll drag your toes a little and then you trip."

On a trail as rocky, rooty and steep as some sections of the Baden-Powell, a trip in the dark can be critical.

He said the participants ran or jogged the route as much as they were able to, only walking when the trail was too rough, too dark or too steep to run.

"This is one of the toughest routes in North America," said Moore.

As well as a club event, Moore organized The Double as a fundraiser for the BC Lung Association.

It's a cause that hits close to home for Moore, because he himself has an immune system disorder called sarcoidosis that affects his lungs. Moore takes medication for the condition, but nonetheless, he said: "It can slow me down quite a bit."

By running The Double, and other distance events he participates in, Moore hopes to show that "you can have a disorder and still achieve a lot." He knows how to manage his condition, by eating right, getting rest and keeping his stress levels low.

This event was an especially satisfying accomplishment because he had attempted it twice before and been unable to finish.

Though he says he has no plans to run it again, he may help organize it for others in the future - either again as a small event for Club Fat Ass, or if there is enough interest, as a larger event.

The BC Lung Association is a non-profit organization dedicated to eradicating lung disease. One in five British Columbians has a respiratory problem and the association strives to help through research, education and support. For more information visit www.bc.lung.ca.

posted on 06/20/2005 to www.nsnews.com